biorhythm

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biorhythm

or

biological rhythm,

cyclic pattern of changes in physiology or in activity of living organisms, often synchronized with daily, monthly, or yearly environmental changes. Rhythms that vary according to the time of day (circadian rhythms), in part a response to daylight or dark, include the opening and closing of flowers and the nighttime increase in activity of nocturnal animals. Circadian rhythms also include activities that occur often during a 24-hour period, such as blood pressure changes and urine production. Annual cycles, called cirannual rhythms, respond to changes in the relative length of periods of daylight and include such activities as migration and animal mating. Marine organisms are affected by tide cycles. Although the exact nature of the internal mechanism is not known, various external stimuli—including light, temperature, and gravity—influence the organism's internal clock; in the absence of external cues, the internal rhythms gradually drift out of phase with the environment.

biorhythm

[′bī·ō‚rith·əm]
(physiology)
A biologically inherent cyclic variation or recurrence of an event or state, such as a sleep cycle or circadian rhythm.

biorhythm

a cyclically recurring pattern of physiological states in an organism or organ, such as alpha rhythm or circadian rhythm; believed by some to affect physical and mental states and behaviour
References in periodicals archive ?
Therein, the functionality of GU was impacted by the biorhythmic needs of OGW in a negative manner.
Don't get me wrong, David Elsworth is a fine trainer, but one is bound to wonder if he has taken that bit of extra time and trouble needed to check out the biorhythmic state of play.
The robotic canine uses biorhythmic technology to create responses that adapt to interactions with humans.
the afternoon circadian trough when most people are naturally at a biorhythmic low point and are most likely to fall asleep.
But under the direction of MIT professor Rosalind Picard, the Media Lab's Affective Computing group has developed computer systems that use biorhythmic sensors attached to a user's body and tiny cameras that record facial gestures to develop individual emotional profiles.