biosocial


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical.

biosocial

[‚bī·ō′sō·shəl]
(zoology)
Pertaining to the interplay of biological and social influences.
References in periodicals archive ?
in Uganda, Journal of Biosocial Science, 1995, 27(1):47-60.
Koc I, Determinants of contraceptive use and method choice in Turkey, Journal of Biosocial Science, 2000, 32(3): 329-342.
Chapters on biosocial perspectives and parental investment look at parental surrogates among primates and somatic aspects of parent-offspring interactions.
Gender and health: Relational, intersectional, and biosocial approaches.
Entry into motherhood among adolescent girls in two informal settlements in Nairobi, Kenya," Journal of Biosocial
In short, taking a syndemic approach calls for a biosocial or biocultural rather than simply a biological understanding of disease (pp.
Human Diet and Nutrition in Biocultural Perspective: Past Meets Present (Studies of the Biosocial society).
Stigmatisation is a biosocial phenomenon, meaning it is a behaviour that can be attributed to both instinctual impulses and our cognitive ability to reason, using the information we are provided with.
It captures the fluid, technological and expanding repertoire of processes, structures and disciplines now appropriated into the exercise of what could be called biopower (Foucault, 1980), and what has been described as the production of the biosocial (Rabinow, 1992), wherein the psychosocial and the sociocultural are increasingly constituted through the biomedical.
Efua Dorkenoo OBE, a renowned biosocial scientist of Ghanaian extraction and long-time fighter against FGM, welcomed the move to take the FGM campaign worldwide, but warned against "short-lived" measures such as offering money to FGM practitioners to abandon the practice.