biosolid

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biosolid

[¦bī·ō‚säl·əd]
(civil engineering)
A recyclable, primarily organic solid material produced by wastewater treatment processes.
References in periodicals archive ?
At Synagro, we see numerous new opportunities to capture the energy and organic benefits from biosolids and residual organics and we are excited about the prospect of partnering with the public sector to deliver real value to both the rate payers and the environment.
Biosolids are the byproduct of a biological water treatment process at Pearl GTL whereby living micro-organisms, rather than chemicals, treat the industrial water produced in the gas-to-liquids conversion process.
2010; Saha and Hossain 2011); however, it provides little indication of the specific bioavailability, mobility or reactivity in soils amended with biosolids.
This material is known as biosolids and is composed of nutrients, organic matter, metals, organic contaminants and pathogenic microorganisms (EPA 2008).
This is the second time the biosolids project has been recognized.
The plant sends a portion of its treated sewage by an 8-inch diameter pipe to the biosolids facility a few miles north, near Highway 99 and the Fiddler's Green Golf Course.
Its history stretches back to the 1970s when the city first started applying biosolids from a smaller treatment plant to 300 acres of farmland.
Farmers who follow pre- and postapplication management regulations can obtain permits to use biosolids for amending fields where food and feed crops are grown.
The biosolids generated create a significant volume of wet-solid waste that must be disposed of in an environmentally responsible manner," Tran said.
They also want to ensure that toxic metals such as cadmium and lead in biosolids are not able to re-enter the food chain, as their presence is a major obstacle to the widespread reuse of biosolids as soil improvers.
In 2002 the National Research Council (NRC) committee on toxicants and pathogens in biosolids applied to land found that adequate information is not available on human exposures from land application of sewage sludge, and recommended response investigations, exposure assessments, and epidemiologic studies (National Research Council [NRC], 2002).
Biosolids charcoal is expected to function as a fertiliser (Niwa et al.