biosonar


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biosonar

[¦bī·ō¦sō‚när]
(physiology)
A guidance system in certain animals, such as bats, utilizing the reflection of sounds that they produce as they move about.
References in periodicals archive ?
I'm being coached in "human echolocation," a variation of the biosonar that bats, dolphins and whales use to "see" the world by interpreting sound.
Now, Danish researchers show that the biosonar of toothed whales and bats share surprisingly many similarities - even though they live in very different environments and vary extremely in size.
We can define echolocation, sometimes called biosonar, as the production, reception, and analysis of sound waves for the purpose of locating objects.
Dolphins, in particular, have deep and shallow diving capability, great eyesight and a biosonar system that scientists admire but don't fully understand.
During sonar exercises at the Navy's undersea testing range near Andros Island in the Bahamas, the researchers used a Navy array of underwater microphones to listen for the biosonar clicks that beaked whales make to search for prey.
Acting as biosonar receiving antennas, the ears of bats perform a critical function in bringing about these ultrasonic sensing capabilities.
The modern toothed whales from the great sperm whale to the smallest dolphins and porpoises use echolocation, a remarkable biosonar, to find their way in the oceans and to locate their prey.
This "stylohyal" bone connects to the auditory bulba (shown in yellow) only in bats that use their larynx to generate echolocation, or biosonar, signals.
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- A new study revealed that the way fruit bats use biosonar to 'see' their surroundings is significantly more advanced than first thought.
They can do things like steer the beam and change the beam width on a click-to-click basis," says Patrick Moore, a scientist and former head of the biosonar program office.
They detect and catch their targets through echolocation, or biosonar, the animal equivalent--and precursor--to man-made sonars.