biotic community


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biotic community

[bī′äd·ik kə′myün·əd·ē]
(ecology)
An aggregation of organisms characterized by a distinctive combination of both animal and plant species in a particular habitat. Also known as biocenose.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first condition that is required for humans to understand themselves as members of an ecological or biotic community is likewise interest.
When we ignore these basic sources of energy and our rootedness in a biotic community, we lose a sense of who we really are: plain citizens rather than lords and masters of the larger Earth community.
Roosevelt's experience in the West and his passion for the hunt galvanized a determination that sport hunting and the biotic community necessary for hunting would not vanish, and when he became president he offered an observation not too different from that of d' Tocqueville.
They envision these engineered hybrids living in a kind of genetic isolation, walled off from the larger biotic community.
The essence of this is that an act is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability, and beauty of the biotic community.
His approach, which he terms "libertarian ecology," recognizes "the claims of the individual as well as those of the social and biotic community.
The stream beds and adjacent riparian areas in these sanctuaries have been so overgrazed by cattle that Norton says "a whole biotic community is gone.
Aldo Leopold, one of the great naturalists said, "Things are wrong, morally wrong, whenever our biotic community is degraded.
Although the concept of a biotic community included both flora and fauna, most of the communities were distinguished by the authors solely by the plant assemblages.
Aldo Leopold's ethical formula rings like truth chiseled in stone: "A thing is right when it tends to promote the integrity, stability, and beauty of the biotic community.
The West Bay Site, by contrast, is currently undeveloped and would have no impacts to community members but would involve wetland and biotic community impacts, as well as new floodplain impacts.
That's counterproductive if our long-term goal is to expand justice, which requires that our species become a "plain member and citizen of the biotic community," as Aldo Leopold counseled.