biotic environment

biotic environment

[bī′äd·ik in′vī·ərn·mənt]
(ecology)
That environment comprising living organisms, which interact with each other and their abiotic environment.
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References in periodicals archive ?
According to REIS (2005), environmental impacts can be divided into physical, socioeconomic impacts and biotic environment.
He added that a number of research projects has been adopted during the year 2012 funded by His Majesty and the Research Council (TRC) in the fields of education, energy, non-renewable resources, biotic environment, human and social sciences, industry, information and communications systems and life sciences, and 63 internal scholarship have been granted in various fields, in addition to what SQU has provided to the local community in terms of various consultations and training courses.
People living in cities are significantly removed from the natural processes that constitute our biotic environment.
The plants mature [approximately equal to] 6 years after planting; at that stage, the trees can reach 10-12 m in height, although the growth rate depends on the physical and biotic environment (4).
At the very heart of the concept of conservation of natural resources there must be a humility about our understanding of the biotic environment, including the roles of soils and water.
Climate affects the biotic factors, which in turn affect the biotic environment.
Content will cover molecules and organelles, tissues and organs, signal perception, plant and biotic environment, and information processing and acquisition.
The book consists of 10 chapters: (1) Introduction; (2) Methods of studying effects of environmental change on crops; (3) Cellular responses to the environment; (4) Water relations, (5) Photosynthesis, respiration, and biosynthesis; (6) Partitioning of photosynthate; (7) Mineral nutrition; (8) Vegetative growth and development; (9) Sexual reproduction, grain yield, and grain quality; and (10) The biotic environment.
The biotic environment of survivors in these populations and in natural populations is certainly changed by selective mortality within the population.
Anecdotal as it is, the case for the view of California's biotic environment at the time of European contact as an altered landscape that showed the effects of the use of fire, selective plant harvesting, and other human activities is strong and can be taken seriously.
If funded, this project will provide a new understanding of the way living things are continuously constructed through time and interact with their biotic environment.
However, the processes that produce ecosystem responses at landscape scales are processes that occur at smaller scales among the component organisms of the ecosystem, interacting with their physical, chemical, and biotic environment.