bioturbation


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bioturbation

[¦bī·o·tər′bā·shən]
(geology)
The disruption of marine sedimentary structures by the activities of benthic organisms.
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This is followed by the development of a model for the investigation of the effects of bioturbation (churning and dispersion of sediment by the bottom macrobiota) on the distribution of sulfide in sediments.
A confounding aspect to Ostrea lurida restoration is the indirect negative effect caused by bioturbation activities of Neotrypaea californiensis and Upogebia pugettensis (Feldman et al.
As with Lockeia, if the small ovate pits are the basal representation of the bioturbation, they can be interpreted as being produced by surface-feeding bivalve molluscs.
The biological activities of Capitella, such as feeding and bioturbation can aid in the decomposition of organic matter and in the oxidation of sulfites in the sediment (Chareonpanich et al.
The upper part consists of nodular to seminodular (knobby-bedded) biomicritic limestone (prevailingly packstone), but instead of bioturbation, pyritized bio- and lithoclasts, tempestite intercalations, and discontinuity surfaces are common.
However, it is impossible to determine if this tentative Northern Archaic occupation is, in fact, associated with the microblades until we ascertain the extent to which cryoturbation and bioturbation may have affected the upper part of the site (e.
A diverse assemblage and abundance of omnivorous fishes (Table 1) foraged intensively over the entire surface of accessible tiles, rapidly removing insects, diatoms, the upper tips of filamentous greens and blue-greens, and all visible sediments via ingestion and/or bioturbation.
In soft-bottom marine communities, bioturbation (biotic disturbance) resulting from the activities of macrobenthos (animals retained on a 500-[micro]m sieve) can drastically alter the physical and chemical properties of sediments (Rhoads, 1974; Schink and Guinasso, 1977; Aller, 1978; Rice, 1986; Rice et al.
However, Silurian rocks of Estonia are rich in trace fossils, which are usually mentioned as worm traces and bioturbation in the geological literature (Kaljo 1970).
The important diagenetic processes recognized are bioturbation, micritization, dissolution, silicification, cementation, dolomitization, fracture fillings, chemical compaction, and secondary porosity development.