bioturbation


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bioturbation

[¦bī·o·tər′bā·shən]
(geology)
The disruption of marine sedimentary structures by the activities of benthic organisms.
References in periodicals archive ?
Diverse and rich benthic fauna and intense bioturbations in the Ohesaare section indicate shallow nearshore environments.
We attributed this difference to the smoothing of habitat features by the trawl footrope as it passed over the bottom of the seafloor (Auster and Langton, 1999), as well as to the removal of the mobile organisms responsible for bioturbation of the sediment (Lohrer et al.
In summary, to advance one time increment [delta]t, one first uses equations (21)-(24) to represent the contributions from bioturbation.
In this paper, plant pigments are used as tracers of organic matter to investigate how density-dependent bioturbation by burrowing shrimp (Callianassa sp.
There is evidence of bioturbation in the A1, A2, and B1 horizons, mostly in the form of active and infilled ant tunnels (krotovinas).
In anaerobic sediments of deep lakes, where resuspension and bioturbation are negligible, PhPs or their ratios might reflect the history of phytoplankton composition and primary production (Cohen 2003, pp.
Interestingly, bioturbation is much greater on the top surface of the upper block than on the sole of the lower block; no burrows are observed penetrating to the horizon containing the skeletal remains.
Some effects of bioturbation by earthworms (Oligochaeta) on archaeological sites.
Aquaculture can also interact with seagrass through disturbances associated with harrowing, dredging, raking, leveling, planting oysters and treatment with carbaryl (an arthropocide used to kill burrowing shrimp, reduce bioturbation, and thus potentially enhance eelgrass, Dumbauld & Wyllie-Echeverria 2003) or through the installment of structures such as those used for long lines and racks (Everett et al.
They influence the availability of nutrients for crop production via a range of activities such as the decomposition of crop residues, immobilisation of nutrients, mineralisation, biological nitrogen fixation, and bioturbation.
The upper part consists of nodular to seminodular (knobby-bedded) biomicritic limestone (prevailingly packstone), but instead of bioturbation, pyritized bio- and lithoclasts, tempestite intercalations, and discontinuity surfaces are common.
Bioturbation is probably responsible for some of the more obvious reworking of Cretaceous fossils into Paleocene strata.