bipedal

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bipedal

[bī′ped·əl]
(biology)
Having two feet.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, an upright climbing adaptation, evolved within the context of tree-dwelling, would not produce all the features required for effective rapid, long-distance terrestrial bipedalism.
The thermoregulatory advantages of hominid bipedalism in open equatorial environments: the contribution of increased convective heat loss and cutaneous evaporative cooling.
Since the Laetoli tracks were discovered, scientists have debated whether they indicate a modern human-like mode of striding bipedalism, or a less-efficient type of crouched bipedalism more characteristic of chimpanzees whose knees and hips are bent when walking on two legs.
His idea was that they were separate events and they happened sequentially - that bipedalism freed the hand to evolve for other purposes," he added.
Theories regarding the origins of hominin bipedalism have spent some considerable time 'on the ground' as a result of the knuckle-walking hypothesis, which postulates that our earliest bipedal ancestor evolved from an ape that knuckle-walked on the ground in a way similar to modern chimpanzees or gorillas.
Bone development was critical for the evolution of our species, since it facilitated locomotion and bipedalism (Rodan 2003).
First, primates stood upright, and the resulting bipedalism liberated the hand.
The lower spine serves as a good basis for testing the habitual bipedal locomotion hypothesis because human lumbar vertebrae and sacra exhibit distinct features that facilitate the transmission of body weight for habitual bipedalism, says Russo.
Specific features such as bipedalism, hairlessness and a larger brain distinguish the human from other animals - and the woman's role in evolution is key.
But it also required more upright scrambling and climbing gaits, prompting the emergence of bipedalism.
The experiment of bipedalism played out in a number of different ways," says Jeremy DeSilva, a biological anthropologist at Boston University.
But we are questioning, social animals; our religious impulse is an evolved characteristic, like bipedalism or consciousness.