bipolar


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Related to bipolar: bipolar disorder

bipolar

1. having two poles
2. relating to or found at the North and South Poles
3. (of a transistor) utilizing both majority and minority charge carriers
4. Psychiatry suffering from bipolar manic-depressive disorder

bipolar

[bī′pō·lər]
(science and technology)
Having two poles.
Capable of assuming positive or negative values, such as an electric charge, or pertaining to a quantity with this property, such as a bipolar transistor.

bipolar

(electronics)

bipolar

(communications)
In digital transmission, an electrical line signalling method where the mark value alternates between positive and negative polarities.

See also AMI.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, stringent regulations and side-effects of anticonvulsants hamper the growth of global bipolar disorder market.
The status of stigma as the battle continues to bring bipolar disorder out of the shadows a decade after bp Magazine debuted.
Also since these depressed or anxious family members usually appear in psychiatrists' offices in their caregiver roles for their relatives with bipolar disorder, their psychiatric disability is often either unappreciated or unnoticed by clinicians (Bipolar Disord.
Briggs is program assistant at the Family Center for Bipolar.
Bipolar is often misdiagnosed as depression because sufferers are more likely to visit their GP when they feel down than when they are in a high mood.
We know that bipolar is primarily a biological illness with a strong genetic influence but triggers are yet to be understood.
The IMPACT of Bipolar Study found that a significant number of participants become more pessimistic about their future after diagnosis which can have a dramatic affect on their sense of wellbeing.
Bipolar involves extreme swings in mood, ranging from extreme depression to mania.
The first-ever Bipolar Scotland Week is taking place in a bid to build on that publicity.
Bipolar affective disorder is a serious, recurrent disorder of mood characterized by episodes of major depression which alternate with episodes of mania or hypomania (hypomania is a less severe form of mania) (1).
Children in families where both parents had bipolar disorder were more likely to develop the illness than those with one bipolar parent.
Further research needs to examine how physicians decide that a child's emotional travails qualify as bipolar disorder and how often youngsters with other mental disorders get misclassified as bipolar, the investigators suggest.