bipolar amplifier

bipolar amplifier

[bī′pō·lər ′am·plə‚fī·ər]
(electronics)
An amplifier capable of supplying a pair of output signals corresponding to the positive or negative polarity of the input signal.
References in periodicals archive ?
5 GHz bipolar amplifier, which uses a combination of lumped and distributed elements as it was drawn in =SCHEMAX=.
When a bipolar amplifier is operated in class AB, the IMD caused by a combination of the nonlinearities in the RF power transistors' transfer characteristics (both amplitude and phase) and the amplifier's circuit parameters under certain circumstances results in the amplifier falling short of the -30 dBc IMD that is required.
With operating voltages of up to +/-18 V, these breakthrough analog components increase performance relative to conventional bipolar amplifiers, while reducing package size by as much as 75 percent and power consumption by up to 50 percent.
Prior to the AD8655, applications requiring low-noise performance had to use higher-priced bipolar amplifiers designed for higher-voltage applications or add discrete components that require more board space and increase system costs.