biquadratic


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Related to biquadratic: biquadratic polynomial

biquadratic

[¦bī·kwə′drad·ik]
(mathematics)
Any fourth-degree algebraic expression. Also known as quartic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chiu, "High input impedance DDCC-based voltage-mode universal biquadratic filter with three inputs and five outputs", Indian Journal of Engineering and Materials Sciences, vol.
The margin of error for the capacity and electric power biquadratic curves is provided in Table A1 and Table A2 in the Appendix.
Secondly, to an enhanced CFO estimator has been proposed which is based on modified FFT and biquadratic interpolation techniques.
It is easy to check that in each case a biquadratic polynomial is uniquely determined by the dofs.
The fluid velocities, pressures, and elevations of the free surface along the spines are represented by biquadratic, [[phi].
The space domain is divided into 4824 eight node element with biquadratic interpolation for displacement and linear interpolation for the pressure field.
28) is transformed to a biquadratic equation of y, namely
The method of representing a subsystem's performance map by one or more biquadratic or bicubic functions is described, and the role of the performance map within the peak-shifting optimal control algorithm is documented.
Eighty 4-node, biquadratic displacement, linear pore pressure with reduced integration elements were used to mesh the poroelastic model of articular cartilage and 1475 4-node, bilinear axisymmetric elements to mesh the remaining elastic parts in the axisymmetric model after mesh sensitivity checks were performed.
With concrete examples he begins with cubic equations, turning to complex numbers, biquadratic equations, equations of degree n and their properties, including plausibility and proof, the search for additional solution formulas, equations that can be reduced in degree, including the decomposition of integer polynomials and Eisenstein's irreducibilty criterion, the construction of regular polygons, the Galois group of an equation, and algebraic structures and Galois theory, including groups and fields, the fundamental theorem, and Artin's version of the fundamental theory.
For example, even Gray's "diary entries" read like this: "We have invented a totally new numerico-exponential calculus", and "Began the theory of cubic and biquadratic residues".
Watt told his son, "You should divide your lesson into 2 parts, one to be dedicated to Geometry and the other to the higher parts of Algebra such as cubic & Biquadratic Equations, the summation of series, the squaring of curves, and other applications of Algebra to geometry.