Birch Bark

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Birch Bark

 

the outer part of the birch cortex, consisting of easily separated, thin, semitransparent, smooth, white, yellowish, or reddish layers.

The best birch bark is obtained from trunks with a diameter of 20 cm and larger. Such products as tar are obtained by the dry distillation method, and bast boxes, baskets, and dishes are manufactured from birch bark. In ancient times, before the invention of paper, official documents and letters were written on birch bark.

References in periodicals archive ?
She was able to pass the art of selecting, gathering, preparing and dyeing the natural birchbark, reeds, roots and berries needed to make these beautiful baskets on to her daughter Judy in the hope she might perpetuate this art which is now dying out in Alaska.
Simcoe's experimentation with questions of form -- as exemplified by her use of birchbark instead of paper -- may be a result of her position as a woman.
Birchbark, unattended, with a saddle on his back, proceeds carefully up the ramp.
Allward's powerful maquette, Justice, which forms part of the Vimy Ridge Memorial (1936); the first Canadian maple leaf flag (1965); and Pierre Elliot Trudeau's birchbark canoe (c.
Voyageur: Across the Rocky Mountains in a Birchbark Canoe by Robert Twigger (Orion, pounds 14.
Listeners who enjoyed Erdrich's The Birchbark House will delight to find themselves back in Omakaya's Ojibwe village, located on an island in Lake Superior.
The Birchbark Target was surveyed using ground magnetics, and contains a strong magnetic anomaly which has not been drilled yet due to the spring thaw.
Building a Birchbark Canoe: The Algonquin Wabanaki Tciman
Early colonists learned to make maple sugar from the American Natives, who used birchbark buckets and hollowed out sumac twigs to collect the sap.
OTCBB:GPVI) is pleased to report it has now commenced ground magnetic geophysical surveys on its' Candle Lake and Birchbark Lake claims in the Fort a'la Corne field of diamondiferous kimberlites in Saskatchewan Canada.
What really pushed me was my children, wanting to make sure they have what I had, and how to survive," Swain told Birchbark as she sat by the crackling sacred fire that has remained lit for much of the past decade at Slant Lake.