bird of prey


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bird of prey

a bird, such as a hawk, eagle, or owl, that hunts and kills other animals, esp vertebrates, for food. It has strong talons and a sharp hooked bill

bird of prey

[′bərd əv ′prā]
(vertebrate zoology)
Any of various carnivorous birds of the orders Falconiformes and Strigiformes which feed on meat taken by hunting.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ricardi is the director of the Massachusetts Bird of Prey Rehabilitation Facility.
For nearly 10 years, the Bird of Prey centre near Lasswade in Midlothian has been breeding nature's flying hunters and introducing them to the public.
The young bird of prey was discovered by a hillwalker on Cawdor Estate near Nairn, close to a pen where partridges were being reared.
Henrietta Lilley, a colleague at Newent centre, said: "Keeping a bird of prey is not like owning a dog or a cat.
The Acton man and the bird of prey share a unique bond in falconry, an ancient hunting skill.
Several studies have concluded that persecution on intensively managed upland grouse moors is the key issue affecting some bird of prey populations .
Only two pairs of the bird of prey tried to nest in England this year - and failed.
CHILDREN at Ysgol Trelogan enjoyed a visit from Mike Wakeman of the Welsh Bird of Prey Centre in Pembrokeshire.
A "HEARTLESS" sniper left a bird of prey peppered with shot and dying in a ditch in the Midlands.
Given the huge increase in bird of prey numbers in recent years, it is a phoney sort of war in my book with the RSPB Birdcrime report painting a very confusing picture.
A RARE bird of prey has been found poisoned on a country estate.
The RSPB said nests belonging to the protected bird of prey had been targeted in two quarries in the last two weeks.