birdsfoot trefoil


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birdsfoot trefoil

birdsfoot trefoil

A nitrogen fixer-it puts nitrogen into your soil acting as natural fertilizer and composter. Very alkalizing and good source of protein. Yellow flowers and leaves are great in salads. In alfalfa clover family.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nitrogen replacement value of kura clover and birdsfoot trefoil in mixtures with cool-season grasses.
A preliminary experiment should clarify which tanniferous legume, sainfoin or birdsfoot trefoil is better suitable as a CT alternative and whether they are sufficiently accepted by cows.
They include the native bluebell, common knapweed, pigmeat, meadow cranesbill and birdsfoot trefoil.
Legumes include the queen of forages (alfalfa), as well as the clovers, peas, vetches, Birdsfoot trefoil and sanfoin.
1992) reported that kura clover yields were similar to birdsfoot trefoil in the first 2 yr and greater after 3 yr when birdsfoot trefoil stands began to decline.
Feeding on vetches, birdsfoot trefoil and bramble flowers, the common blues looked too good to ignore with a camera.
They suggest placing bee colonies in the center of the alfalfa field instead of along the side and surrounding the field with flowering crops like birdsfoot trefoil or sainfoin so that bees would become covered with other pollen and no longer transmit alfalfa pollen if they leave the field.
STILL farther up the coast, a walk through the dunes at Freshfield gave Gary McLardy 500-1,000 wild strawberries, silverweed, valerians, cleavers (aka goosegrass), ragworts, hemp agrimonys and blooming birdsfoot trefoil.
The popularity of birdsfoot trefoil, a related species, has grown steadily over the past few decades.
p Jim Brady counted 328 northern marsh orchids, as well as bee orchid and birdsfoot trefoil near the Bottle and Glass pub, Rainford.
The first commercial variety of birdsfoot trefoil in the world with both the ability to spread and to resist root diseases is now available.
Denison presented comparison data for alfalfa and birdsfoot trefoil in the March 1992 issue of Plant Physiology.