birnessite


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birnessite

[bər′nes·īt]
(mineralogy)
A manganese oxide mineral often found as a primary constituent of manganese nodules or crusts.
References in periodicals archive ?
He covers assessing manganese removal from over 100 groundwater treatment plants, manganese removal from groundwater: the characterization of filter media coating, the biological and physico-chemical formation of birnessite during the ripening of manganese removal filters, identifying the bacterial population in manganese removal filters, reducing the ripening time of full-scale manganese removal filters with manganese oxide coated media, and factors controlling the ripening of manganese removal filters in conventional aeration-filtration groundwater treatment.
Although still in widespread use among mineral collectors, "psilomelane" properly does not denote a valid species but rather a mixture of cryptomelane, romanechite, hollandite and birnessite (Bayliss, 2000).
The researchers reacted chromite with birnessite, a manganese-containing mineral that often forms in weathered rocks and soils containing chromite.
The researchers conclude that within 100 days, chromite and birnessite could generate chromium (VI) at concentrations above the World Health Organization's limit for drinking water--which is 50 micrograms per liter.
2]-adsorption surface area analyser after the mineral had been degassed under vacuum at 105[degrees]C overnight, except for the ferrihydrite and birnessite, which were degassed under vacuum at room temperature.
The predominant mineral in the coatings is birnessite, a manganese oxide compound that includes traces of sodium, calcium, and potassium.
Microscopic analyses of the birnessite coatings reveal many fossilized bacteria, so White speculates that those organisms derived energy from the manganese dissolved in the water that flowed over them.
Additionally, at soil pH [is greater than] 5-6, Mn adsorption onto aluminium and ferric oxides and birnessite (Mn oxide) increases (McBride 1978; McKenzie 1980).
Oxides & Hydroxides Anatase Birnessite Doyleite Franconite Gibbsite Goethite Hematite Hochelagaite Lueshite Todorokite Woodruffite VUK3
Kim proposed that birnessite should be considered a mineral group, with individual, Ca, [Mn.
8 mm in size, having a pearly luster and forming intergrown aggregates on birnessite pseudomorphs after serandite.