bismuth telluride


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bismuth telluride

[′biz·məth ′tel·yə‚rīd]
(inorganic chemistry)
Bi2Te3 Gray, hexagonal platelets with a melting point of 573°C; used for semiconductors, thermoelectric cooling, and power generation applications.
References in periodicals archive ?
Materials are typically either conductors or insulators, but topological insulators such as bismuth telluride are exotic hybrids: They block electric current in their interiors yet allow electrons to flow along their surfaces.
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- Scientists succeeded in showing the promise of surface-conduction channels in topological insulator nanoribbons made of bismuth telluride and demonstrate that surface states in these nanoribbons are 'tunable' - able to be turned on and off depending on the position of the Fermi level.
Bismuth telluride is well known as a thermoelectric material and has also been predicted to be a three-dimensional topological insulator with robust and unique surface states.
Researchers from UCLA's Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science and from the materials division of Australia's University of Queensland show the promise of surface-conduction channels in topological insulator nanoribbons made of bismuth telluride and demonstrate that surface states in these nanoribbons are "tunable" - able to be turned on and off depending on the position of the Fermi level.
The commercially available, best, and simple compound thermoelectric material for refrigeration around room temperature is bismuth telluride ([Bi.
Headquartered in Saxonburg, Pennsylvania, with manufacturing, sales, and distribution facilities worldwide, the Company produces numerous crystalline compounds including zinc selenide for infrared laser optics, silicon carbide for high-power electronic and microwave applications, and bismuth telluride for thermoelectric coolers.
Hidden inside a device for chilling wine is the unusual compound called bismuth telluride.
Physicists at the Department of Energy's (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have revealed that this material is called bismuth telluride.
The enthusiasm of those early days was fueled by successes with bismuth telluride, still the best thermoelectric material known.
The thermoelectric tube is constructed by stacking conical rings of bismuth telluride as thermoelectric material and nickel as metal.
The nano-approach uses a commonly available thermoelectric material called Bismuth Telluride, constructed on a nanoscale to create an assembly that researchers believe blocks the transmission of phonons, which carry heat, and enhances the transmission of electrons, which carry electrical energy.
Headquartered in Saxonburg, Pennsylvania, with manufacturing, sales, and distribution facilities worldwide, the Company produces numerous crystalline compounds including zinc selenide for infrared laser optics, cadmium zinc telluride for gamma radiation detectors, silicon carbide for high-power electronic and microwave applications, and bismuth telluride for thermoelectric coolers.