bit depth


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bit depth

[′bit ‚depth]
(computer science)
In a digital file, the number of colors for an image; calculated as 2 to the power of the bit depth; for example, a bit depth of 8 supports up to 256 colors, and a bit depth of 24 supports up to 16 million colors.

bit depth

The maximum numeric value in a coding system. The bit depth is the maximum number of bits in the system's storage element and represents either the total number of discrete items that can be represented or the largest magnitude. For example, the bit depth of an audio sample determines its dynamic range (see audio bit depth). The bit depth of a screen pixel determines the total number of colors that can be displayed (see color depth). See bit specifications and binary values.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, these images have a bit depth ranging from 8 to 24.
Most scanners internally use a bit depth higher than 8 bits per channel, such as 10, 12, or 14 bits.
To keep things simple, most applications refer to bit depth as "number of colors.
Whatever the control method or device, the user doesn't have to load drivers or update firmware on either the camera or the printer--since JetSend handles the issues of resolution, bit depth, and available printer memory automatically.
For example, in a digital image with a bit depth of 2, each pixel will have [2.
Use multiple file formats and mixed bit depths in the same project--including interleaved--without converting files
It also forecasts shipments by price segment, interface type, sensor type, bit depth, resolution, and operating system in North America through 2005.
The depth map quantization level was shown as the per-pixel bit depth and the depth scale (i.
The new 1920 x 1200 resolution M-Vision utilizes Texas Instruments' DarkChip DLP technology, ensuring unmatched black levels, RGB bit depth and dynamic range.
The new scanner designed for photo and PC, features 2400 dots-per-inch scanning at a bit depth of 36 bits, enabling users to capture the finest details, from rich colors to deep shadows.
Other technical panels will focus on issues of greater bit depth, wider color gamut, higher frame rates, and 7.
High quality edge blending and multi-projector tiling are equally robust by way of high bit depth processing that ensures a seamless, contiguous image can be created from multiple projectors.