bitmap display

bitmap display

(hardware)
A computer output device where each pixel displayed on the monitor screen corresponds directly to one or more bits in the computer's video memory. Such a display can be updated extremely rapidly since changing a pixel involves only a single processor write to memory compared with a terminal or VDU connected via a serial line where the speed of the serial line limits the speed at which the display can be changed.

Most modern personal computers and workstations have bitmap displays, allowing the efficient use of graphical user interfaces, interactive graphics and a choice of on-screen fonts. Some more expensive systems still delegate graphics operations to dedicated hardware such as graphics accelerators.

The bitmap display might be traced back to the earliest days of computing when the Manchester University Mark I(?) computer, developed by F.C. Williams and T. Kilburn shortly after the Second World War. This used a storage tube as its working memory. Phosphor dots were used to store single bits of data which could be read by the user and interpreted as binary numbers.

References in periodicals archive ?
The phone also features a large 5-line bitmap display capable of supporting animation, graphics, variable font sizes and character sets for multiple languages.
BREWapi consists of a set of interfaces that enables manufacturers and developers to create wireless applications, including browsers and user interfaces, by offering easy and consistent access to MSM chip-level functions such as graphics and bitmap display support, position location information, and the ability to play a music file or display a still image or an animation file.
Additional features include full bitmap display of the Millennium switch and its connections, context-sensitive help and a common look and feel across platforms.