bitter pit


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bitter pit

[′bid·ər ‚pit]
(plant pathology)
A disease of uncertain etiology affecting apple, pear, and quince; spots of dead brown tissue appear in the flesh of the fruit and discolored depressions are seen on its surface. Also known as Baldwin spot; stippen.
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AppleGenie aims at new scientific knowledge and technology for assessing the physiological status of apple orchards as a means to overcome two major burdens for apple growers and fresh chains: Ineffective thinning programs for crop load management; and Bitter pit post-harvesting disorder.
This symptom is called bitter pit and Bramley's Seedling is particularly susceptible, being a vigorous tree that produces large fruits.
We are already working on finding physiological solutions to issues like bitter pit in current apple varieties with the gene-based information available to us and lay a foundation for improved varieties in the future through generation of sports (mutations) and breeding," Dhingra said.
A This problem, bitter pit, is caused by calcium deficiency and can be improved by feeding the tree with a few handfuls of a general fertiliser such as blood, fish and bonemeal or National Growmore during mild weather in winter, then hoeing in a dressing of lime in early spring.
A YOUR apples have bitter pit, by the sounds of it.
Former miners sacked during the bitter pit strike of the mid-1980s are to get up to pounds 10,000 in extra pension payments denied to them for the past 18 years.
Mourners who packed into Holy Trinity Parish Church in Portrush, Co Antrim, heard how Guy Harper's death had plunged the community into "the bitter pit of grief and anger".
Sprays of calcium chloride or calcium nitrate reduce damage from bitter pit, scald and internal breakdown.
Drought combined with a calcium deficiency in the soil can cause bitter pit in apples and blossom-end rot in tomatoes and peppers.
This very cost-effective technique developed by Agricultural Research Service scientists at Wenatchee, Washington, reduces incidence of bitter pit, cork spot, alfalfa greening, and internal breakdown - four quality factors that render some apples and pears unmarketable.
If your soil is a little on the acid side, give apples and pears a light dressing of garden lime to prevent the Calcium deficiency symptom, bitter pit, from developing inside the fruit later in the summer.