bittern


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Related to bittern: bitten, American bittern, least bittern

bittern,

common name for migratory marsh birds of the family Ardeidae (heronheron
, common name for members of the family Ardeidae, large wading birds including the bittern and the egret, found in most temperate regions but most numerous in tropical and subtropical areas.
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 family). The American bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus), often called "stake driver" because of a territorial male's booming call in the spring, is widely distributed in E North America. It is mostly nocturnal and feeds on frogs, fish, and insects. When pursued, the bittern escapes detection by standing motionless with its bill uplifted, its brown and yellow markings and striped foreneck blending with the marsh grasses. It is about 2 to 3 ft (61–91 cm) tall; the western and eastern least bitterns, genus Ixobrychus, are about half this size. Of the 12 species of bitterns, 8 constitute the smaller birds. The female bittern builds the nest, which consists of an unkempt arrangement of sedge grass and reeds. The nests are built on the ground along rivers or lakeshores and house the clutch of 3 to 6 eggs. Both male and female share the incubation duties. Bitterns are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Ciconiiformes, family Ardeidae.

bittern

[′bid·ərn]
(chemical engineering)
Concentrated sea water or brine containing the bromides and magnesium and calcium salts left in solution after sodium chloride has been removed by crystallization.
(vertebrate zoology)
Any of various herons of the genus Botaurus characterized by streaked and speckled plumage.

bittern

1
any wading bird of the genera Ixobrychus and Botaurus, related and similar to the herons but with shorter legs and neck, a stouter body, and a booming call: family Ardeidae, order Ciconiiformes

bittern

2
the bitter liquid remaining after common salt has been crystallized out of sea water: a source of magnesium, bromine, and iodine compounds
References in periodicals archive ?
YORKSHIRE BUILT Locomotive 4464 Bittern was |built in Doncaster in 1937 She is a Pacific 4-6-2 | locomotive Others in the same | class include the Sir Nigel Gresley and Mallard She carries a Garter Blue livery |
Reserve manager Lindsay Beaton said: "Far from skulking in the reedbed, the bitterns are often out in the open, or in sparse scrubby undergrowth.
Niall Hatch, of Birdwatch Ireland, said: "This is tremendously exciting news because bitterns became extinct here in the mid-19th century.
An icon of British ornithology, the bittern - closely related to the heron - was declared extinct in the UK in the 1880s.
The Refuge is within the North American summer range of the Least Bittern (Peterson 2002), and prior nest searches conducted by SCNWR biologists and past researchers demonstrated the area supports a healthy breeding population (Jacobs and Wilson 1997, Nelson 2003).
A total of 75 "booming" males - counted by their distinctive mating call - were heard by conservationists surveying the English reedbeds where the bittern is found.
The proposed development area, the front portion of the property, is the primary habitat for the American bittern," Mr.
But seeing the bittern added a thrilling bonus," she said.
Three are operational - the blue Sir Nigel Gresley, green Union of South Africa and blue Bittern, which has been restored into 1930s style.
Gone completely are: Bittern, Common Gull, Nightingale, Corn Bunting and Woodlark.
00 Child price PS139 Six Special Steam MonkeyWorld Trains - Autumn Great Gathering Departs 26 October 2013 A second chance to see all six surviving A4 class locomotives at the National Railway Museum in York, where the fastest steam locomotive in the world, Mallard, will be joined by Sir Nigel Gresley, Bittern, Union of South Africa and their transatlantic twins Dwight D Eisenhower and Dominion of Canada, which have been shipped over especially for this grand reunion.
The bittern is battling back from the brink of extinction in the UK, and two were spotted at Rainton Meadows, near Houghton-le-Spring, which is the headquarters of Durham Wildlife Trust.