bituminous coal


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bituminous coal:

see coalcoal,
fuel substance of plant origin, largely or almost entirely composed of carbon with varying amounts of mineral matter. Types

There is a complete series of carbonaceous fuels, which differ from each other in the relative amounts of moisture, volatile matter,
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.

bituminous coal

[bī′tü·mə·nəs ′kōl]
(geology)
A dark brown to black coal that is high in carbonaceous matter and has 15-50% volatile matter. Also known as soft coal.

bituminous coal

a soft black coal, rich in volatile hydrocarbons, that burns with a smoky yellow flame. Fixed carbon content: 46--86 per cent; calorific value: 1.93 × 107 -- 3.63 × 107 J/kg
References in periodicals archive ?
However, attempts to smelt iron using mixtures of anthracite and bituminous coal and coke produced uneven results and little success.
Through this acquisition, the company will widen its surface mining business into bituminous coal markets, Bob Benson, president and CEO of North American Coal, said.
The present investigation is an experimental study on the samples of oil shale semi-coke, bituminous coal and their blends on TGA apparatus under non-isothermal conditions.
3] in the case of bituminous coal, and the fraction <1.
The upgraded coal will also produce about 66 percent fewer ashes than bituminous coal, it said.
The bituminous coal is used by metalcasters to form a layer of lustrous carbon that works to keep molten metal from penetrating the sand.
Bituminous coal is the largest contributor to its sales earning both at home and abroad.
2 gallons of heating oil, 70--90 pounds of bituminous coal (depending on its carbon content), or 970 cubic feet of natural gas.
Ingham, Making Iron and Steel: Independent Mills of Pittsburgh, 1820-1920 (Columbus, 1991), detailed studies of the coordinated labor policies of firms that did not rank among the nation's giants have been limited to the construction, garment, and bituminous coal industries, in all of which trade unions played conspicuous roles.
A higher average emission factor in the residential and commercial sector can be attributed to the steady consumption of bituminous coal and anthracite (presumably for home heating).
Disappointingly absent from the book is DiLorenzo's earlier article in which he demonstrated that most of the industries supposedly monopolized by the trusts - bituminous coal, lead, leather, linseed oil, liquor, petroleum, salt, sugar, and steel - had falling prices and rising output in the decade before the Sherman Act.
A final agreement was reached between the four-member Independent Bituminous Coal Bargaining Alliance and the United Mine Workers for about 7,500 miners in Alabama, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia.