black cohosh


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Related to black cohosh: red clover, dong quai, Evening primrose oil
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black cohosh

black cohosh

Good for women. See also Blue Cohosh. The root is most commonly used part and is a good phytoestrogen source used traditionally to balance hormones (lowers ovary production of progesterone) and control hot flashes, PMS, gynecological disorders, menopause, depression, nervous disorders, arthritis, rheumatism, rheumatoid arthritis, infections, sore throat, bronchitis, stimulates menstrual flow, helps curb diarrhea, cough suppressant, lowers blood pressure, tinnitus (ringing ears). Powerful cardiac stimulant, but has a sedative effect on the nervous system. Often taken together with St. John’s Wort. Do not take during pregnancy. Grows up to 8 ft. with columns of white flowers. Leaves look like baneberry which is poisonous, but baneberry has red shiny berries. Test first, Some women have experienced upset stomach. Avoid if you have breast cancer. May cause headaches, nausea, impaired vision, vertigo, miscarriage.
References in periodicals archive ?
Black cohosh triterpene glycosides and polyphenols were stable over the 3-year period of the clinical trial.
However, women taking the placebo or one of the black cohosh treatments still experienced on average four to five hot flashes daily, the scientists report in the Dec.
Black cohosh (known as both Actaea racemosa and Cimicifuga racemosa) is a member of the buttercup family.
Recent studies have linked black cohosh to liver failure, increased risk of breast cancer metastasis, and increased risk of Alzheimer's.
Agnus Castus or black cohosh should not be taken with the pill, fertility drugs,HRT or any other hormonal treatment or other medication unless recommended by an experienced practitioner.
Remifemin is a popular extract of black cohosh used for PMS and menopausal symptoms, including hot flashes.
The following supplements touted for cancer treatment will be reviewed: astragalus, black cohosh, blue-green algae, coenzyme Q10, echinacea, essaiac tea, garlic, ginko biloba, ginger, ginseng, green tea, milk thistle, mushroom extracts, pc-specs, pycnogenol, and shark cartilage.
As an alternative to hormones, Hirt suggests natural estrogens such as kudzu and black cohosh to ease some menopausal symptoms, though many doctors remain skeptical of herbal remedies.
Two studies on black cohosh are currently underway in the United States.
Companion" plants that indicate a good site include Jack-in-the-pulpit, bloodroot, Solomon's seal, jewel weed, galax, trillium, wild yam, hepatica, black cohosh, and wild ginger.