black

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black

1. of the colour of jet or carbon black, having no hue due to the absorption of all or nearly all incident light
2. Chess Draughts
a. a black or dark-coloured piece or square
b. the player playing with such pieces
3. a black ball in snooker, etc
4. (in roulette and other gambling games) one of two colours on which players may place even bets, the other being red
5. Archery a black ring on a target, between the outer and the blue, scoring three points

Black

1
1. Sir James (Whyte). born 1924, British biochemist. He discovered beta-blockers and drugs for peptic ulcers: Nobel prize for physiology or medicine 1988
2. Joseph. 1728--99, Scottish physician and chemist, noted for his pioneering work on carbon dioxide and heat

Black

2
Sometimes derogatory a member of a dark-skinned race, esp someone of Negroid or Australoid origin

black

a term used to refer to a variety of non-white ethnic groups. Black is a preferred form, especially among ethnic groups of African origins, reflecting a pride and identity in being black. The use of the term is associated with the rise of black political activism in the US in the 1960s, and is reflected in the slogan ‘Black is Beautiful’. Other terms to describe black people, such as coloured, Negro or Negress, are now generally considered offensive.

In the UK (and elsewhere), however, there is controversy about the use of the term to describe ‘non-white’ persons of Asian origin. Many Asians object to the use of the word ‘black’ to describe them and argue that this usage confuses the identity of a large number of very different ethnic groups such as Pakistanis, Bangladeshis, Indians, West Indians, Africans and so on. The counter argument is that ‘non-white’ persons in the UK can be subject to DISCRIMINATION and institutionalized RACISM whatever their ethnic or national origins. In this sense, groups of both African and Asian origin share, to a significant extent, a common experience. See also BLACK POWER MOVEMENT, NEGRITUDE.

black

[blak]
(chemistry)
Fine particles of impure carbon that are made by the incomplete burning of carbon compounds, such as natural gas, naphthas, acetylene, bones, ivory, and vegetables.
(communications)
(optics)
Quality of an object which uniformly absorbs large percentages of light of all visible wavelengths.

black

Western color for mourning. [Christian Color Symbolism: Leach, 242; Jobes, 357]
See: Death

black

symbol of sin and badness. [Color Symbolism: Jobes, 357]
See: Evil
References in classic literature ?
He was almost speechless; his quick breathing under the blankets pulled up to his chin, his glittering, restless black eyes reminded me of a wild bird caught in a snare.
Then he remained silent for a while, and all at once looked cheerfully with his glittering, black eyes at Rostov.
She fixed her black eyes steadily on him, her lips moved slightly, and she said something in French.
From the Woods, on a roan horse, carbine across pommel, rode the young man with the quick black eyes.
Giving up this inquiry in despair, she took to studying Dinah's nose, eyes, mouth, and hair, and wondering whether it was better to have such a sort of pale face as that, or fat red cheeks and round black eyes like her own.
And he could see that she had detected it with those steady, brilliant black eyes.
It must be admitted that the round, black eyes were rather bulging in appearance; but the expression upon the Woggle-Bug's face was by no means unpleasant.
The appearance of the infant, however, while in this state of compression, is whimsically hideous, and "its little black eyes," we are told, "being forced out by the tightness of the bandages, resemble those of a mouse choked in a trap.
The startling contrast between the corpse-like pallor of her complexion and the overpowering life and light, the glittering metallic brightness in her large black eyes, held him literally spell-bound.
Whenever that look appeared in her wild, bright, deeply black eyes, it invested her with a strange remoteness and intangibility: it was as if she were hovering in the air, and might vanish, like a glimmering light that comes we know not whence and goes we know not whither.
The mate who, on account of his peculiar build, could not turn his head freely, twisted his thick trunk slightly, and ran his black eyes in the corners towards the steward.
The black eyes kept upon the railroad-carriage in which she had travelled, settled upon it a moment too late.