black root rot

black root rot

[′blak ′rüt ‚rät]
(plant pathology)
Any of several plant diseases characterized by dark lesions of the root.
A fungus disease of the apple caused by Xylaria mali.
A fungus disease of tobacco and other plants caused by Thielaviopsis basicola.
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References in periodicals archive ?
R bunodes causes black root rot mainly in tropical woody hosts.
arcuata like most Rosellinia species causes black root rot disease, mainly in tropical and subtropical woody hosts.
But tests have shown that planting strawberries in these flexible tubes significantly reduced incidence of black root rot and increased yields 16- to 32-fold.
Plant diseases such as web blight, black root rot, and root-infecting nematodes can prove challenging for nurseries and some of these disease problems can occur on hollies once they are planted," Benson said.
Plant pathologists have devised several methods of prevention for black root rot including lowering the soil pH, selecting disease resistant holly cultivars, and drenches of fungicides to prevent the disease in nursery plants.
Black root rot incidence was increased 3-fold by sowing field pea, but was not significantly affected by wheat.
Additional keywords: cracking clay, minimum tillage, organic C, farming system, mycorrhiza, black root rot, gross margin, Haplustert, compaction.
however, can reduce the intensity of bacterial black root rot of cotton but increases infestation by Rhizoctonia solani (Rothrock and Kirkpatrick 1990).
Additional keywords: cracking clay, minimum tillage, soil organic C, farming system, mychorrhiza, black root rot, long-fallow disorder.
The objective of this study, therefore, was to quantify soil physical and chemical properties, and soil-borne disease incidence (usually black root rot in this site), under continuous and long-fallow cotton in an irrigated, grey, self-mulching Vertosol in eastern Australia, with a view to identifying soil factors other than AM which could contribute to cotton growth rate reductions.
60 m depth in 1995 was higher with continuous cotton, and may be caused by a reduction in nitrogen uptake in the latter due to the greater severity of black root rot disease (Table 6).