black smoker


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black smoker

[¦blak ′smōk·ər]
(oceanography)
References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, SMS species are adapted to chemicals released by black smokers at levels that could be toxic to shallow-water species.
dissertation on the chemistry of the fluids gushing from the first deep-sea black smoker hydrothermal vents sampled on a mid-ocean ridge.
The key to the creation of black smoker chimneys is an unusual chemical property of the mineral anhydrite, or calcium sulfate (CaS[O.
In 1988, on a cruise to the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the northeastern Pacific, Van Dover persuaded John Delaney of the University of Washington to take a picture of a black smoker vent with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera while all of the submersible Alvin's external lights were turned off and the portholes blocked.
One of the most fascinating aspects of black smoker chimneys is how rapidly they form.
Detrick says photographs taken of the sea bottom before the cruise suggested hydrothermal activity, but it wasn't until Leg 106 that scientists knew the exact location and extent of the chimneys and that the venting involved high temperatures, as evidenced by the black smokers.
Califano noted that research in the CASAColumbia report indicated that if only 10 percent of menthol smokers quit and only 10 percent of those who would have started smoking menthol cigarettes did not start because of a ban, more than 323,000 smoking-attributable deaths would be avoided by 2050, including 91,744 black smokers.
We know those copper mines were actually black smokers from the bottom of the ocean, so there is a huge connection in my career, and to my discoveries, to what is happening on Cyprus.
Of 300 sites identified since the discovery of black smokers in 1977, Hannington says only 165 have massive sulfide deposits.
Animals associated with black smokers live on bacteria that use dissolved chemicals from hot water coming out of vents to produce their food.
The experts captured the video while studying underwater volcanic vents which are also known as black smokers.
French artist Dove Allouche's eponymous exhibition used photographs of black smokers taken on pioneering oceanographic missions to depths of six thousand to ten thousand feet below the surface.