black thread

black thread

[′blak ‚thred]
(plant pathology)
A fungus disease affecting the para rubber tree at the point where the tree is tapped, caused by Phytophthora meadii and characterized by black stripes extending through the exposed bast into the cambium or wood. Also known as black stripe; stripe canker.
References in classic literature ?
The bean thanked him most prettily, but as the tailor used black thread, all beans since then have a black seam.
It was only on board the schooner, when surrounded by white faces, by unfamiliar sights and sounds, that Karain seemed to forget the strange obsession that wound like a black thread through the gorgeous pomp of his public life.
Then he went out again; and then she put her thimble and scissors in her pocket, and stuck a needle threaded with black thread neatly in the bosom of her gown, and put on her outer clothing smartly, at a little glass behind the door, in which I saw the reflection of her pleased face.
A nearer look revealed black threads tied to the arm and fingers, the ends of threads disappearing through holes bored in the back of the case.
Her eyes were two silver suspender-buttons cut from a pair of the Magician's old trousers, and they were sewed on with black threads, which formed the pupils of the eyes.
It is mine now, and to me the black threads with which she stitched it are as part of the contents.
A green coloured cloth and a black thread wrapped around Zabiullah's legs were evidence of his family's desperate attempts to save the boy from the incurable disease.
Terri secured her applique and added details to her quilt using black thread and a straight stitch.
Sherwin Tugna, had a Muslim-inspired electric teal skirt by Jo Rubio topped with a barong-inspired blouse embroidered with black thread by local craftsmen.
She knew a black thread would compete with the black/ white prints but a white thread would not work well on the bright prints.
Although the maritime charts, road maps, and atlas pages that composed the surfaces of these works were drenched in dark gouache and india ink, their edges eroded and reshaped with dark blue and black thread, sites in and around the Mediterranean remained visible.