black-and-white television

black-and-white television

[¦blak ən ¦wīt ′tel·ə‚vizh·ən]
(communications)
References in periodicals archive ?
LESS than 100 people are now watching black-and-white television in the North East, new figures show.
Paul Williams, spokesperson for TV Licensing, said: "Today's figures show, even in the digital age, more than 11,000 homes still watch their favourite programmes on black-and-white televisions.
Black-and-white television has its perks, and there remains a reduced licence fee for viewers.
Black-and-white televisions have become increasingly rare on the high street but they are still available online.
In May 1969 Hawaii Business reported that "Television sales as a whole have jumped from 33,000 sets in 1966 to 40,000 this year," with a growing emphasis on In 1966, black-and-white television purchases outnumbered color by 2-to-1.
He puts the paper down, and one of his ashy hands crushes an empty Colt 45 Malt Liquor can in front of a black-and-white television with the volume quite loud.
The penetration of color television is so great that recent statistics published by the Electronic Industries Association indicated black-and-white television would shortly become extinct.
Also, for some retro enthusiasts, restoring and using black-and-white televisions is a hobby.