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black

1. of the colour of jet or carbon black, having no hue due to the absorption of all or nearly all incident light
2. Chess Draughts
a. a black or dark-coloured piece or square
b. the player playing with such pieces
3. a black ball in snooker, etc
4. (in roulette and other gambling games) one of two colours on which players may place even bets, the other being red
5. Archery a black ring on a target, between the outer and the blue, scoring three points

Black

1
1. Sir James (Whyte). born 1924, British biochemist. He discovered beta-blockers and drugs for peptic ulcers: Nobel prize for physiology or medicine 1988
2. Joseph. 1728--99, Scottish physician and chemist, noted for his pioneering work on carbon dioxide and heat

Black

2
Sometimes derogatory a member of a dark-skinned race, esp someone of Negroid or Australoid origin

black

a term used to refer to a variety of non-white ethnic groups. Black is a preferred form, especially among ethnic groups of African origins, reflecting a pride and identity in being black. The use of the term is associated with the rise of black political activism in the US in the 1960s, and is reflected in the slogan ‘Black is Beautiful’. Other terms to describe black people, such as coloured, Negro or Negress, are now generally considered offensive.

In the UK (and elsewhere), however, there is controversy about the use of the term to describe ‘non-white’ persons of Asian origin. Many Asians object to the use of the word ‘black’ to describe them and argue that this usage confuses the identity of a large number of very different ethnic groups such as Pakistanis, Bangladeshis, Indians, West Indians, Africans and so on. The counter argument is that ‘non-white’ persons in the UK can be subject to DISCRIMINATION and institutionalized RACISM whatever their ethnic or national origins. In this sense, groups of both African and Asian origin share, to a significant extent, a common experience. See also BLACK POWER MOVEMENT, NEGRITUDE.

black

[blak]
(chemistry)
Fine particles of impure carbon that are made by the incomplete burning of carbon compounds, such as natural gas, naphthas, acetylene, bones, ivory, and vegetables.
(communications)
(optics)
Quality of an object which uniformly absorbs large percentages of light of all visible wavelengths.

black

Western color for mourning. [Christian Color Symbolism: Leach, 242; Jobes, 357]
See: Death

black

symbol of sin and badness. [Color Symbolism: Jobes, 357]
See: Evil
References in classic literature ?
The moonbeams have no longer so silvery a gleam, nor contrast so strongly with the blackness of the shadows among which they fall.
Terrible moment: full of struggle, blackness, burning
As soon as ever I had barred the door, utter blackness overwhelmed me, and I fell on the floor.
A terrible sorrow had fallen upon him when he had been happy and he had let his soul fill itself with blackness and had refused obstinately to allow any rift of light to pierce through.
She came on till he could just see her -- a shadow ascending the shingly slope, and growing out of the blackness of the night.
The little light he possessed spread its beams so narrowly, that frustrated belief was a curtain broad enough to create for him the blackness of night.
And with the wand of ivory she pointed to the gates of ivory, through which came light and laughter, and with the wand of ebony she pointed to the gates of coal, through which came blackness and groans.
High features, naturally strong and powerfully expressive, had been burnt almost into Negro blackness by constant exposure to the tropical sun, and might, in their ordinary state, be said to slumber after the storm of passion had passed away; but the projection of the veins of the forehead, the readiness with which the upper lip and its thick black moustaches quivered upon the slightest emotion, plainly intimated that the tempest might be again and easily awakened.
As the last rays of daylight dwindled and disappeared, absolute blackness settled down on Treasure Island.
Accordingly a sailor was sent up to the masthead to try to catch a sight of land, and reported that nothing was to be seen but the sea and sky, except a huge mass of blackness that lay astern.
Monsieur d'Albon admired the long lashes of her eyelids, the blackness of her eyebrows, and the dazzling whiteness of a skin devoid of even the faintest tinge of color.
That sorrow hides its woe, the blackness of which surpasses all other mourning; it cannot be described; happily there are but few women whose heart-strings are thus severed.