blackout


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blackout

1. a momentary loss of consciousness, vision, or memory
2. a temporary electrical power failure or cut
3. Electronics a temporary loss of sensitivity in a valve following a short strong pulse
4. a temporary loss of radio communications between a spacecraft and earth, esp on re-entry into the earth's atmosphere

blackout

[′blak‚au̇t]
(communications)
(electricity)
The shutting off of power in an electrical power transmission system, either deliberately or through failure of the system.

blackout

blackoutclick for a larger image
The relationship between acceleration and time at maximum G required to produce symptoms of grayout and blackout.
i. A condition of temporary loss of vision, possibly also loss of consciousness, resulting from the effect of high and sustained positive acceleration (g) on the body. A condition that occurs at g value higher than 1 that causes gray-out. Normally, this occurs when the body is exposed to +4 and +4.5 g for about 10 seconds or more. This can be postponed slightly by using a g-suit, by crouching, or by using a reclining seat. The onset of gray-out and blackout conditions varies from individual to individual. It is also dependent on physical conditioning.
ii. The fadeout of radio communications caused by changes in the ionosphere resulting from a nuclear explosion or ionospheric disturbances.
iii. An enforced period during which all lights in an area are turned off or concealed, so as not to be visible from the air. It is one of the passive air defense measures.

blackout

A complete loss of power. See brownout.
References in periodicals archive ?
EDS: UPDATING POSSIBLE CAUSE OF BLACKOUT IN BOTTOM 3 GRAFS)
5 million people across the West Midlands will suffer from blackouts at some stage in their lives.
David Palmquist, manager at Trinity Worldwide Reprographic, which lost power Friday, recalled a blackout downtown roughly three years ago.
Relating this back to the two studies above, blackouts and large surges account for less than 5 percent of all power problems and happen in Normal Mode.
Although conservation probably wouldn't have prevented the complicated events leading to the blackout of 2003, "if we demand less electricity, there will be less of a strain on the grid," says Debbie Boger of the Sierra Club.
The blackout generated plenty of unfounded allegations.
A senior law enforcement official said the FBI had determined the blackout was a 'natural occurrence' and there was no evidence of terrorism, and that the Homeland Security Department agreed.
The only way to escape Tokyo's turgid humidity, blackouts or not, is to get away.
A company must provide notice to a participant (including a beneficiary) who self-directs investment of plan assets in a defined contribution plan and is affected by the blackout period.
Cardiff rarely hears the sound of dancehall live and direct, but nevertheless, Blackout hopes his blend of upbeat reggae and hip hop will bring a bit of sunshine to our bitter Welsh winter.
In 1997, they founded the Blackout Arts Collective in New York.