blade


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

blade

1. the flattened expanded part of a leaf, sepal, or petal
2. the long narrow leaf of a grass or related plant
3. Archaeol a long thin flake of flint, possibly used as a tool
4. short for shoulder blade

blade

[blād]
(botany)
The broad, flat portion of a leaf. Also known as lamina.
(electricity)
A flat moving conductor in a switch.
(engineering)
A broad, flat arm of a fan, turbine, or propeller.
The broad, flat surface of a bulldozer or snowplow by which the material is moved.
The part of a cutting tool, such as a saw, that cuts.
(vertebrate zoology)
A single plate of baleen.

blade

1. The flat metal surface of a trowel with which plaster is applied.
2. The cutting part of a knife, plane, etc.
3. The broad, slightly concave surface of a bulldozer, or the like, which pushes the material being moved.
4. One of the principal rafters of a roof.
5. To remove, spread, or level a material such as dirt, or gravel by the use of a grader.

blade

i. A rotating airfoil driven by a helicopter engine to produce vertical lift. Also called a rotor blade.
ii. A rotating airfoil driven by an aircraft engine to produce a thrust force approximately in line with the longitudinal axis of the aircraft. Also called a propeller blade. It is restricted to that part of a propeller arm or of a rotating wing from the shank outward (i.e., that part having an efficient airfoil shape that cleaves the air). See propeller.
iii. A rotating airfoil that is a part of a compressor in a gas turbine engine. Also called a compressor blade.

blade

One component in a system that is designed to accept some number of components (blades). Blades can be individual servers or clients that plug into a single cabinet or individual port cards that add connectivity to a switch. A blade is typically a hot swappable hardware device, but a software architecture could use the blade terminology as well. See blade server and blade PC.
References in classic literature ?
But I hated to spoil the Queen's blade upon his tough stick or no less tough hide.
I mean daggers aren't the only things with short blades.
The green warrior was much put to it to hold his own, and I felt that the unequal struggle could last but a moment longer when the huge fellow discovered my plight, and tearing himself from those that surrounded him, he raked the assailant from my back with a single sweep of his blade, and thus relieved I had little difficulty with the others.
A single sweeping circle of my own blade caught the flying weapon and hurled it clattering against the far wall, and then, as I sidestepped my antagonist's impetuous rush, I let him have my point full in the stomach as he hurtled by.
More and more weakly the torn and bleeding arm struck home with the long sharp blade, then the little figure stiffened with a spasmodic jerk, and Tarzan, the young Lord Greystoke, rolled unconscious upon the dead and decaying vegetation which carpeted his jungle home.
But if thou knowest him, my jolly blade, wilt thou go with me and bring me to him?
He escaped my blade, and ran down this corridor," replied Kar Komak.
Throwing up his left arm as a boxer might ward off a blow, Tarzan struck upward beneath the left forearm of the lion, at the same time rushing in with his shoulder beneath the animal's body and simultaneously drove his blade into the tawny hide behind the shoulder.
He did not dare intervene now until one of the Wieroo had overcome the other, lest the two should turn upon him at once, when the chances were fair that he would be defeated in so unequal a battle as the curved blade of the red Wieroo would render it, and so he waited, watching the white-robed figure slowly choking the life from him of the red robe.
Quick as a panther, Alleyne sprang in with a thrust, but Tranter, who was as active as he was strong, had already recovered himself and turned it aside with a movement of his heavy blade.
For which," says he, "I will give you any reasonable price; nor do I insist upon its being silver-hilted; only a good blade, and such as may become a soldier's thigh.
Still more delightful were the moments when they reached the stream where the rows ended, and the old man rubbed his scythe with the wet, thick grass, rinsed its blade in the fresh water of the stream, ladled out a little in a tin dipper, and offered Levin a drink.