blast


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blast

1. 
a. the rapid movement of air away from the centre of an explosion, combustion of rocket fuel, etc
b. a wave of overpressure caused by an explosion; shock wave
2. any of several diseases of plants and animals, esp one producing withering in plants

Blast

 

blasting, supplying air or other gases in industrial heat engineering plants in order to ensure or intensify the physicochemical processes taking place in them. The gas is compressed and supplied by means of blowers and compressors. There are two types of blast: cold blast, in which ordinary air is supplied, and hot blast, in which air is preheated to 1100°-1200°C. The substitution of a hot blast for a cold blast in metallurgy has increased the productivity of furnaces.

Blasts with a constant moisture content, which eliminates the adverse effect of moisture variations in ordinary air on smelting conditions, appeared in the 1940’s. Blasts enriched with oxygen to increase the rate of the smelting process began to be widely used in the 1960’s. The highest blast flow rate is characteristic of blast furnaces in which the average amount of gas supplied is 2 m3/min per cu m of furnace working volume (in modern blast furnaces, 6,000–7,000 m3/min, under a pressure of 0.3–0.5 meganewtons per sq m [MN/m2]). The simultaneous supply to the furnace of oxygen-enriched air and of natural gas not only increases the productivity but also reduces the consumption of coke. An oxygen blast supplied from above at a pressure of 0.9–1.5 MN/m2 and a rate of 300–800 m3/min is used in converter production.

blast

[blast]
(computer science)
To release internal or external memory areas from the control of a computer program in the course of dynamic storage allocation, making these areas available for reallocation to other programs.
(engineering)
The setting off of a heavy explosive charge.
(physics)
The brief and rapid movement of air or other fluid away from a center of outward pressure, as in an explosion.
The characteristic instantaneous rise in pressure, followed by a sudden decrease, that results from this movement, differentiated from less rapid pressure changes.

blast

i. The brief and rapid movement of air or other fluid away from a center of outward pressure, as in an explosion.
ii. The characteristic instantaneous rise in pressure followed by a sudden decrease that results from this movement, differentiated from less-rapid pressure changes.

blast

(1)
BLT, used especially for large data sends over a network or comm line. Opposite of snarf. Usage: uncommon. The variant "blat" has been reported.

blast

(2)
[HP/Apollo] Synonymous with nuke. Sometimes the message "Unable to kill all processes. Blast them (y/n)?" would appear in the command window upon logout.
References in periodicals archive ?
Blast Fusion utilizes Magma's patent-pending FixedTiming methodology and single, unified data model architecture, which allow it to perform logic optimization and physical design while taking timing constraints into account.
All five blasts occurred near the site of India's only other nuclear test, in 1974.
It not only proved to be an excellent way of attacking the 5-2, its presence made our blast play become more effective.
With Blast Create, the front-end designers were able to accurately predict the final timing of the link block prior to handing it off to the back-end designers.
Quartz RC can be accessed within the Blast Fusion flow or can be used as a standalone system by ASIC designers via industry-standard LEF/DEF (Library Exchange Format/Design Exchange Format) input.
Among the residents startled by last week's blast was Michelle Koetke, chairwoman of Residents to Preserve Newbury Park and an opponent of Dos Vientos Ranch.
creates, designs, develops, manufactures and markets proprietary blast mitigation materials.
As a result, the process excels at cleaning small detail and lettering that often require additional blasting during abrasive blast cleaning.
A possible result, he speculates, is that geologists may reassess ``hazard zones'' marked on maps at Yosemite - and possibly other mountainous national parks - to take air blasts into account.
Magma's Blast FPGA offers an effective blend of increased automation and advanced technology, maximizing productivity and ensuring that designers can quickly, confidently reach design closure.
Workers were planning another blast later in the day, and were hoping to clear away the resulting rubble in order to get to the trapped bus.