blast


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blast

1. 
a. the rapid movement of air away from the centre of an explosion, combustion of rocket fuel, etc
b. a wave of overpressure caused by an explosion; shock wave
2. any of several diseases of plants and animals, esp one producing withering in plants

Blast

 

blasting, supplying air or other gases in industrial heat engineering plants in order to ensure or intensify the physicochemical processes taking place in them. The gas is compressed and supplied by means of blowers and compressors. There are two types of blast: cold blast, in which ordinary air is supplied, and hot blast, in which air is preheated to 1100°-1200°C. The substitution of a hot blast for a cold blast in metallurgy has increased the productivity of furnaces.

Blasts with a constant moisture content, which eliminates the adverse effect of moisture variations in ordinary air on smelting conditions, appeared in the 1940’s. Blasts enriched with oxygen to increase the rate of the smelting process began to be widely used in the 1960’s. The highest blast flow rate is characteristic of blast furnaces in which the average amount of gas supplied is 2 m3/min per cu m of furnace working volume (in modern blast furnaces, 6,000–7,000 m3/min, under a pressure of 0.3–0.5 meganewtons per sq m [MN/m2]). The simultaneous supply to the furnace of oxygen-enriched air and of natural gas not only increases the productivity but also reduces the consumption of coke. An oxygen blast supplied from above at a pressure of 0.9–1.5 MN/m2 and a rate of 300–800 m3/min is used in converter production.

blast

[blast]
(computer science)
To release internal or external memory areas from the control of a computer program in the course of dynamic storage allocation, making these areas available for reallocation to other programs.
(engineering)
The setting off of a heavy explosive charge.
(physics)
The brief and rapid movement of air or other fluid away from a center of outward pressure, as in an explosion.
The characteristic instantaneous rise in pressure, followed by a sudden decrease, that results from this movement, differentiated from less rapid pressure changes.

blast

i. The brief and rapid movement of air or other fluid away from a center of outward pressure, as in an explosion.
ii. The characteristic instantaneous rise in pressure followed by a sudden decrease that results from this movement, differentiated from less-rapid pressure changes.

blast

(1)
BLT, used especially for large data sends over a network or comm line. Opposite of snarf. Usage: uncommon. The variant "blat" has been reported.

blast

(2)
[HP/Apollo] Synonymous with nuke. Sometimes the message "Unable to kill all processes. Blast them (y/n)?" would appear in the command window upon logout.
References in classic literature ?
The stranger became silent and seemed overcome with sadness, but another blast from the whistle of the passenger engine aroused him.
He had no right to be a martyr; and, beholding him so fit to be happy and so feeble for all other purposes, a generous, strong, and noble spirit would, methinks, have been ready to sacrifice what little enjoyment it might have planned for itself, --it would have flung down the hopes, so paltry in its regard,--if thereby the wintry blasts of our rude sphere might come tempered to such a man.
His voice and laugh, which perpetually re-echoed through the Custom-House, had nothing of the tremulous quaver and cackle of an old man's utterance; they came strutting out of his lungs, like the crow of a cock, or the blast of a clarion.
and how often was he thrown into complete dismay by some rushing blast, howling among the trees, in the idea that it was the Galloping Hessian on one of his nightly scourings!
The last blast was peculiarly strong one, and after the small rubbish was done raining around us and we were just going to shake hands over our deliverance, a later and larger stone came down amongst our little group of pedestrians and wrecked an umbrella.
That blast only means that he has been sighted from the signal- station.
Just here the blast of a toy tin trumpet came faintly down the green aisles of the forest.
Sir Prior,'' he said, ``thou blowest a merry note, but it may not ransom thee we cannot afford, as the legend on a good knight's shield hath it, to set thee free for a blast.
Here and there a fishing boat, with a rag of sail, running madly for shelter before the blast, now and again the white wings of a storm-tossed seabird.
Nature herself Doth aid the Tartar with a deadly blast Following the wild onslaught.
We are now on the sea, at night, without any pilot, in a frail bark; should a blast of wind upset the boat we are lost.
But the family were glad again when they perceived that the latch was lifted by some traveller, whose footsteps had been unheard amid the dreary blast which heralded his approach, and wailed as he was entering, and went moaning away from the door.