blasting powder

blasting powder

[′blas·tiŋ ‚pau̇d·ər]
(materials)
A powder containing less nitrate, and in its place more charcoal than black powder; composition is 65-75% sodium or nitrate, potassium nitrate, 10-15% sulfur, and 15-20% charcoal.
References in classic literature ?
Clandestinely we made a few bushels of first-rate blasting powder, and I superin- tended my armorers while they constructed a lightning- rod and some wires.
We'll have to go back and get some of your big tunnel blasting powder, Tom," suggested Ned.
If you could get a bag of blasting powder at the front door with a slow match to it--"
And the first surprise came very soon, when the explosives (to which he owed his sudden chance of engagement)--dynamite in cases and blasting powder in barrels--taken on board, main hatch battened for sea, cook restored to his functions in the galley, anchor fished and the tug ahead, rounding the South Foreland, and with the sun sinking clear and red down the purple vista of the channel, he went on the poop, on duty, it is true, but with time to take the first freer breath in the busy day of departure.
Through the years, Lindsay has tested the pits as livestock feed, fireplace logs, ground cover, soil conditioner, an ingredient in blasting powder, a plastics filler, a bug-bait carrier, olive oil and as a source for making methane gas.
In the past, it wasn't uncommon for miners to climb a blocked ore pass with blasting powder on their shoulders to place a charge.
Citizens of the United States used his dependable gun and blasting powder to build and defend the nation.
They drilled small holes, added blasting powder or a new explosive called nitroglycerine, lit the fuse, and ran before it exploded.
It is an early coal mining expression referring to the highly-volatile blasting powder used.
With blasting powder, picks, and shovels, they labor in and day out.
The cost of tools and blasting powder came out of a miner's pay, and he had to buy his family's food and clothing at the company's store.