blast

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blast

1. 
a. the rapid movement of air away from the centre of an explosion, combustion of rocket fuel, etc
b. a wave of overpressure caused by an explosion; shock wave
2. any of several diseases of plants and animals, esp one producing withering in plants

Blast

 

blasting, supplying air or other gases in industrial heat engineering plants in order to ensure or intensify the physicochemical processes taking place in them. The gas is compressed and supplied by means of blowers and compressors. There are two types of blast: cold blast, in which ordinary air is supplied, and hot blast, in which air is preheated to 1100°-1200°C. The substitution of a hot blast for a cold blast in metallurgy has increased the productivity of furnaces.

Blasts with a constant moisture content, which eliminates the adverse effect of moisture variations in ordinary air on smelting conditions, appeared in the 1940’s. Blasts enriched with oxygen to increase the rate of the smelting process began to be widely used in the 1960’s. The highest blast flow rate is characteristic of blast furnaces in which the average amount of gas supplied is 2 m3/min per cu m of furnace working volume (in modern blast furnaces, 6,000–7,000 m3/min, under a pressure of 0.3–0.5 meganewtons per sq m [MN/m2]). The simultaneous supply to the furnace of oxygen-enriched air and of natural gas not only increases the productivity but also reduces the consumption of coke. An oxygen blast supplied from above at a pressure of 0.9–1.5 MN/m2 and a rate of 300–800 m3/min is used in converter production.

blast

[blast]
(computer science)
To release internal or external memory areas from the control of a computer program in the course of dynamic storage allocation, making these areas available for reallocation to other programs.
(engineering)
The setting off of a heavy explosive charge.
(physics)
The brief and rapid movement of air or other fluid away from a center of outward pressure, as in an explosion.
The characteristic instantaneous rise in pressure, followed by a sudden decrease, that results from this movement, differentiated from less rapid pressure changes.

blast

i. The brief and rapid movement of air or other fluid away from a center of outward pressure, as in an explosion.
ii. The characteristic instantaneous rise in pressure followed by a sudden decrease that results from this movement, differentiated from less-rapid pressure changes.

blast

(1)
BLT, used especially for large data sends over a network or comm line. Opposite of snarf. Usage: uncommon. The variant "blat" has been reported.

blast

(2)
[HP/Apollo] Synonymous with nuke. Sometimes the message "Unable to kill all processes. Blast them (y/n)?" would appear in the command window upon logout.
References in classic literature ?
At that instant, however, the blast of a fish-dealer's conch was heard, announcing his approach along the street.
They each fire eleven hundred and one thunder blasts at a single dash - it is the usual salute for an eleventh-hour guest; a hundred for each hour and an extra one for the guest's sex; if it was a woman we would know it by their leaving off the extra gun.
Call the first witness,' said the King; and the White Rabbit blew three blasts on the trumpet, and called out, `First witness
Give me leave to set my horn to my mouth and blow three blasts thereon.
The trumpeters, all the while, blew their blasts shriller and shriller; each soldier shouted a battle cry, and often fell with it on his lips.
The plains were swept by keen and bitter blasts of wintry wind; the ground was generally covered with snow, game was scarce, so that hunger generally prevailed in the camp, while the want of pasturage soon began to manifest itself in the declining vigor of the horses.
Each gust of the clouded mood that seemed warmed by the heat of a heart flaming with anger has its counterpart in the chilly blasts that seem blown from a breast turned to ice with a sudden revulsion of feeling.
They stood as still as clouds which the son of Saturn has spread upon the mountain tops when there is no air and fierce Boreas sleeps with the other boisterous winds whose shrill blasts scatter the clouds in all directions--even so did the Danaans stand firm and unflinching against the Trojans.
The boatswain died during a storm, so they wrapped him up in a sheet, and put him in his own sea chest, and threw him overboard; but they neglected, in their hurry-skurry, to say prayers over him, and the storm raged and roared louder than ever, and they saw the dead man seated in his chest, with his shroud for a sail, coming hard after the ship, and the sea breaking before him in great sprays like fire; and there they kept scudding day after day and night after night, expecting every moment to go to wreck; and every night they saw the dead boatswain in his sea chest trying to get up with them, and they heard his whistle above the blasts of wind, and he seemed to send great seas, mountain high, after them that would have swamped the ship if they had not put up the deadlights.
The house stood at one of the principal corners in the village; and by its well-trodden doorway, as well as the sign that was swinging with a kind of doleful sound in the blasts that occasionally swept down the lake, was clearly one of the most frequented inns in the place.
Courtiers are, with regard to court rumors, like old soldiers, who distinguish through the blasts of wind and bluster of leaves the sound of the distant steps of an armed troop.
Brooke, conscious of having weakened the blasts of the "Trumpet" against him, by his reforms as a landlord in the last half year, and hearing himself cheered a little as he drove into the town, felt his heart tolerably light under his buff-colored waistcoat.