blight

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blight,

general term for any sudden and severe plant disease or for the agent that causes it. The term is now applied chiefly to diseases caused by bacteria (e.g., bean blights and fire blight of fruit trees), viruses (e.g., soybean bud blight), fungi (e.g., chestnut blight), and protists (e.g., potato blight). Other plant afflictions (caused by insects or unfavorable climatic conditions) that display similar symptoms are also called blights. See diseases of plantsdiseases of plants.
Most plant diseases are caused by fungi, bacteria, and viruses. Although the term disease is usually used only for the destruction of live plants, the action of dry rot and the rotting of harvested crops in storage or transport is similar to the rots
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Blight

A term applied to a deteriorating influence or condition which affects the value of a property or real estate.

Blight

 

an injury to a plant caused by intense sunlight or contrasting temperatures. Blights also include diseases caused by certain fungi, for example, Monilia cinerea, and by bacteria, for example, Bacterium amylovorum; such blights are infectious. Injuries caused by the incorrect use of pesticides are often called blights.

Blights result in the withering of parts of the bark, shoots, leaves, and flowers. They often kill plants. Coating tree trunks and thick branches with milk of lime is recommended for the control of sun and heat blights. Infectious blights can be controlled through the use of insecticides, fungicides, or bactericides and by pruning and burning affected plant parts. The instructions for the use of pesticides must be carefully followed to prevent the pesticides from blighting the plants.

blight

[blīt]
(plant pathology)
Any plant disease or injury that results in general withering and death of the plant without rotting.

blight

In plants, a fungus disease causing them to wither.
References in periodicals archive ?
252) Such a redefinition would, ideally, address all of the abuses touched on above; it would restrict blighting to urban and residential areas, adopt clearer objective standards for both the determination of blight and the "but for" test, control the reach and scale of TIF or redevelopment areas and ensure that the eradication of blight, and not a short-sighted scramble to pad the local tax base, remains the organizing principle of redevelopment.
However, the court recognized that when a long period of time elapses between the time of blighting and the time of condemnation, a landowner can suffer significant damages in the form of condemnation blight, marked by departing tenants, unmarketability, and profit loss.
While most of the council appears ready to reward billboard companies for violating the law and blighting the city with 11,000 eyesores, Councilwoman Cindy Miscikowski has offered a sensible alternative: Get tough.
See Colin Gordon, Blighting the Way: Urban Renewal Economic
We have all seen them and heard the rumblings about the blighting influence of these signs in our communities.