blind landing


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

blind landing

[¦blīnd ′lan·diŋ]
(aerospace engineering)
Landing an aircraft solely by the use of instruments because of poor visibility.
References in periodicals archive ?
The organisation that introduced the winning system, MIT's Radiation Lab, was an outsider to the decades-old contest for a blind landing system, notes Conway, and this is significant, for the new organisation felt unconstrained by pre-existing customs or assumptions.
While back in its earliest days (before WWII), it was considered a blind landing system, now anyone not flying for dollars or Euros will see a 200-foot minimum or a little more above the runway approach-end area--a.
The Tornado ECR MLU, the upgraded aircraft is equipped with an integrated IN-GPS navigation system supported by a multi-mode receiver system for approaches and ILS blind landings.
In the early years of aviation, pilots were frequently forced to make blind landings due to inclement weather, a problem that led to proposals for a dizzying array of technological solutions from the suspension of lit balloons over airfields to the use of high-powered X- rays as guidance beams.
The Airports Authority of India is installing new equipment for so-called Category III blind landings at the Indira Gandhi Airport in Delhi.