blind landing


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blind landing

[¦blīnd ′lan·diŋ]
(aerospace engineering)
Landing an aircraft solely by the use of instruments because of poor visibility.
References in periodicals archive ?
The organisation that introduced the winning system, MIT's Radiation Lab, was an outsider to the decades-old contest for a blind landing system, notes Conway, and this is significant, for the new organisation felt unconstrained by pre-existing customs or assumptions.
While back in its earliest days (before WWII), it was considered a blind landing system, now anyone not flying for dollars or Euros will see a 200-foot minimum or a little more above the runway approach-end area--a.
The Tornado ECR MLU, the upgraded aircraft is equipped with an integrated IN-GPS navigation system supported by a multi-mode receiver system for approaches and ILS blind landings.
In the early years of aviation, pilots were frequently forced to make blind landings due to inclement weather, a problem that led to proposals for a dizzying array of technological solutions from the suspension of lit balloons over airfields to the use of high-powered X- rays as guidance beams.
The Airports Authority of India is installing new equipment for so-called Category III blind landings at the Indira Gandhi Airport in Delhi.
On several approaches, the right seated pilot's vision was completely obscured and blind landings were successfully made using only the EVS system for reference.