blister


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Related to blister: blood blister, water blister

blister,

puffy swelling of the outer skin (epidermis) caused by burn, friction, or irritants like poison ivy. A response of the body to protect deeper tissue, blisters generally contain serum, the liquid component of blood. The so-called blood blister, however, forms over ruptured capillaries and therefore contains whole blood.

blister

[′blis·tər]
(engineering)
A raised area on the surface of a metallic or plastic object caused by the pressure of gases developed while the surface was in a partly molten state, or by diffusion of high-pressure gases from an inner surface.
(geology)
A domelike protuberance caused by the buckling of the cooling crust of a molten lava before the flowing mass has stopped.
(graphic arts)
A damaged area on a photographic material where the emulsion has separated from the base.
(materials)
A roughly circular or elliptic unbonded area between plies of a laminated material; usually caused by trapped moisture. Also known as steam blow.
(medicine)
A local swelling of the skin resulting from the accumulation of serous fluid between the epidermis and true skin.
(mining engineering)
A protrusion, more or less circular in plan, extending downward into a coal seam.
(nucleonics)
A protuberance that sometimes develops on the surface of a nuclear-reactor fuel element during use, generally because of entrapped gases.

blister

1. A roughly circular or elongated unbonded area between plies of laminated constructions, as in wood veneer. Usually caused by entrapped moisture. Also called steam blow.
2. A spongy raised portion of a roofing membrane, where separation of the felts has occurred or the membrane is not bonded to the substrate as a result of the expansion of water and air trapped in the membrane.
3. A raised spot on the surface of the metal caused by expansion of gas in a sub-surface zone during thermal treatment.
4. A raised area on the surface of a molded plastic caused by the pressure of internal gases on its incompletely hardened surface.
5. See blistering
6. A convex, raised area on the surface of a pipe which indicates an internal separation.

blister

A bulge or blisterlike protuberance on an aircraft, usually dome-shaped and often transparent, from which a person may observe or operate a flexible gun.

blister

1. a small bubble-like elevation of the skin filled with serum, produced as a reaction to a burn, mechanical irritation, etc
2. a transparent dome or any bulge on the fuselage of an aircraft, such as one used for observation
References in periodicals archive ?
Scholl's donut pads or Compeed's moisture-absorbing blister plasters can protect against rubbing, and even help a blister heal faster.
3 Acetyl Salicylic Acid Dispersible Tablet 350mg 1x10x10 Packing specification: AL STRIP/AL BLISTER | Specification: IP/BP/USP | Strength: 350 MG
Lower susceptibility to LME-raw material price fluctuations of aluminum (40% of CONSTANTIA Blister Eco vs.
Eliminating the need for cold-form foils also allows for a smaller blister footprint, up to 40-60% size reduction, and provides clear visibility of the tablet/capsule in the blister cavity.
Cover the blister with a dressing larger than the blister.
A related service offered by Constantia Flexibles is a simulation of the so-called cross-permeation in coldform blister packs.
In order to successfully integrate frangible seal technology, it is critical that frangible seal manufacturers consider the specific requirements of every custom blister reservoir and design a blister solution that considers material compatibility, burst characteristics, reagent volume delivered, and long-term storage requirements.
Unfortunately there is no specific antidote to the chemicals in the sap but these blisters can be very painful indeed and so pain relief is essential.
Blisters are dome-shaped defects that may occur when a coated object is immersed in water, when water lies on a horizontal coated surface (as during and after a rain), or upon exposure to high humidity.
In an observational study he carried out, between 2009-2012, Dr Ratnam found that conservative treatment (not deliberately puncturing) of blisters in burn wounds is safe and that healing was faster and qualitatively superior in the area that was protected by blister skin.
An understanding of these specialized material properties and processing allows the blister fabricator to "dial-in" the specific burst strength needed for activation --though not fragile enough to rupture prematurely due to routine handling, assembly, or shipping activities.
Cover the blister: Loosely cover the blister with a bandage.