blister rust


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Related to blister rust: Cronartium ribicola

blister rust:

see rustrust,
in botany, name for various parasitic fungi of the order Uredinales and for the diseases of plants that they cause. Rusts form reddish patches of spores on the host plant. About 7,000 species are known.
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blister rust

[′blis·tər ‚rəst]
(plant pathology)
Any of several diseases of pines caused by rust fungi of the genus Cronartium; the sapwood and inner bark are affected and blisters are produced externally.
References in periodicals archive ?
2012 saw the first planting of seedlings that might be able to fend off blister rust.
Treatments to limit white pine blister rust have included the physical removal of understory species in the genus Ribes, which is an alternate host for the pathogen (Maloy 1997); chemical spraying of Ribes species; and breeding of resistant sugar pine (Samman and Kitzmiller 1996).
By request of Quinn and McKay, scientists from Cornell University revisited the white pine blister rust issue with better science and better understanding than what existed in 1911.
Blister rust is not an isolated case--chestnut blight, Dutch elm disease, sudden oak death and pests like emerald ash borer and the hemlock wooly adelgid all threaten our forests.
Philippe Tanguay, a molecular forest pathologist with the Canadian Forest Service, said a genetic fingerprint of the new discovery determined it was a mutation of an existing strain of blister rust and was not a new strain.
At that time, a disease called white pine blister rust had been brought into the country.
Less than two years ago, this area was a majestic stand of elder whitebarks, several of which were identified as plus trees--high-value trees that are both producing cones and possibly resistant to the infamous white pine blister rust.
We were there to shoot footage for an American Forests video about our Endangered Western Forests (EWF) initiative to raise awareness of the peril posed to Western forests by white pine blister rust and the epidemic of mountain pine beetles.
Working at American Forests, there is something I can do to help these forests survive the twin threats they're facing--an invasive disease, white pine blister rust, and a scourge of insects, mountain pine beetle.