blister rust


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Related to blister rust: Cronartium ribicola

blister rust:

see rustrust,
in botany, name for various parasitic fungi of the order Uredinales and for the diseases of plants that they cause. Rusts form reddish patches of spores on the host plant. About 7,000 species are known.
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blister rust

[′blis·tər ‚rəst]
(plant pathology)
Any of several diseases of pines caused by rust fungi of the genus Cronartium; the sapwood and inner bark are affected and blisters are produced externally.
References in periodicals archive ?
Whitebark restoration revolves around the hope that we can selectively breed enough blister rust resistant seedlings to plant resilient forests large enough to sustain the ecosystem that relies on the tree species.
In the late 1990s, researchers studied thousands of Glacier's whitebark pines and found that 44 percent were dead and more than 75 percent of living trees had been infected with blister rust.
The second program at Dorena, the white pine blister rust research, addresses a bigger problem, as white pines - and the blister rust - are spread throughout the United States.
The lantana blister rust attacks the stems, leaf stalks and leaves, effectively killing the plant.
NRDC fears that this one-two punch--beetles attacking mature whitebark pines and blister rust killing smaller ones--could have a devastating impact on high-altitude forests across the American West.
His research delved into four areas: (1) forest tree diseases, especially white pine blister rust, (2) decay in building timbers and toxicity of creosotes to wood-destroying fungi, (3) language of mycology, and (4) taxonomy of boletes and hydnums (types of mushrooms and fungi).
There's every reason to expect that blister rust is really going to take hold in Yellowstone," she says.
Gypsy moths, Dutch elm disease, and white pine blister rust have taken a terrible toll.
The original black currant farming ban occurred when the United States began importing European white pine seedlings, and white pine blister rust disease came with them.
Struggling for life in the face of challenges--the pesky mountain pine beetle, a non-native fungal disease called white pine blister rust, and the always ominous force of climate change --the species could certainly use someone advocating for its restoration.
Trees can be pretty nice, especially if they don't get overrun with caterpillars, Japanese beetles, canker rot or blister rust.