blockade

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blockade,

use of naval forces to cut off maritime communication and supply. Blockades may be used to prevent shipping from reaching enemy ports, or they may serve purposes of coercion. The term is rarely applied to land sieges. During the Napoleonic wars, both France and Great Britain attempted to control neutral commerce through blockades and embargoes which neither could enforce with sufficient rigor. The Declaration of Paris (see Paris, Declaration ofParis, Declaration of,
1856, agreement concerning the rules of maritime warfare, issued at the Congress of Paris. It was the first major attempt to codify the international law of the sea.
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) proclaimed (1856) that blockades were henceforth to be announced to all affected parties and would be legal only if effectively enforced against all neutrals. In both World Wars blockades were made more effective by the employment, in addition to naval vessels, of mines and aircraft. North Vietnamese ports were mined and blockaded by the United States during later stages of the Vietnam War. Blockades have also occasionally been employed in times of peace as threats to implement diplomacy, as in the blockade of Cuba by the United States in 1962.

blockade

Med the inhibition of the effect of a hormone or a drug, a transport system, or the action of a nerve by a drug
References in periodicals archive ?
On the first day, the young blockaders gathered at the road, singing and playing drums, wearing button blankets and other regalia.
Any one or more of the above pressures may force the blockader to limit the embargo's scale and scope such that its only chance at success-fully coercing concessions is if it can be protracted to the extent that cumulative pain compensates for its relative inability to inflict severe immediate pain.
But to the blockaders it is the Grassy Narrows Traditional Land Use Area--land that their forefathers agreed to share in Treaty Three of 1873 but that, they maintain, was never surrendered.
A queen is not usually considered the best blockader of weak pawns.
With those words, the Elsipogtog First Nation anti-fracking blockader said her dad wept as he vowed to burn his Red Serge uniform upon her release from police custody.
If the crew proved unwilling, the blockader would have to supply a prize crew of mariners to take the ship there, in addition to a warship escort.
Oh my gosh, they're going to kill me before hearing me out," Mi'kmacq anti-fracking blockader Amy Sock thought as camouflage-clad tactical police with assault rifles and attack dogs chased her down.
He was also a highly experienced blockader, having commanded the U.
Now, blockader Ron Plain, 51, has been ordered by a judge to pay CN railway $16,000 in fines for the 13-day protest that captured the country's attention and was one of the first signs of the movement's potential impact.
The inherent realities of shipboard life regularly demanded that sailors break color barriers when faced with large tasks such as chasing a blockader, fighting a gale, or working guns in combat.
More important is the fright which the blockaders administered to the Government.
The blockaders reported fake news in their coverage of the first few days of the siege on Qatar.