block

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block

2. a casing housing one or more freely rotating pulleys
3. Pathol
a. interference in the normal physiological functioning of an organ or part
b. See heart block
c. See nerve block
4. Psychol a short interruption of perceptual or thought processes
5. Computing a group of words treated as a unit of data on a tape, disk, etc
6. Athletics short for starting block
7. Cricket a mark made near the popping crease by a batsman to indicate his position in relation to the wicket

Block

A large piece of stone, taken from the quarry to the mill for sawing and further working.

Block

 

in engineering:

(1) A unit of a mechanism in the form of a wheel with a groove around its circumference over which a cable or chain is drawn. It is used to change the direction of a tractive force and to obtain a force or velocity advantage; more rarely, to transfer a torque. Depending on their function, blocks are known as guide, balance, runner, and driving (for imparting rotary motion to a shaft) pulleys. In order to achieve a large force or velocity advantage, a lifting mechanism made up of a combination of blocks (a block and tackle) is used.

(2) A subassembly of a machine, consisting of several identical parts, such as a block of cylinders in an internal combustion engine or the spindle block in a multiple-spindle machine.

(3) A stone (concrete or ceramic) of large size (appreciably larger than a brick) used in the construction of buildings and for road surfacing.

N. IA. NIBERG

block

[bläk]
(computer science)
A group of information units (such as records, words, characters, or digits) that are transported or considered as a single unit by virtue of their being stored in successive storage locations; for example, a group of logical records constituting a physical record.
The section of a computer memory or storage device that stores such a group of information units. Also known as storage block.
To combine two or more information units into a single unit.
A contiguous group of text characters that is marked for moving, copying, saving, deletion, or some other word-processing operation.
(design engineering)
A metal or wood case enclosing one or more pulleys; has a hook with which it can be attached to an object.
(mining engineering)
A division of a mine, usually bounded by workings but sometimes by survey lines or other arbitrary limits.
In quarrying, a large portion of rock that is removed from the quarry as a solid mass for further processing at a mill.
(petroleum engineering)
The subdivision of a sea area for the licensing of oil and gas exploration and production rights.
(statistics)
In experimental design, a homogeneous aggregation of items under observation, such as a group of contiguous plots of land or all animals in a litter.

block

block, 6
1. A masonry unit; a concrete block.
2. (Brit.) A walling unit which exceeds in length, width, or height the dimensions specified for a brick.
3. A solid piece of wood or other material.
4. A plank or timber which serves as bridging between joists or the like.
5. In quarrying, the large piece of stone, generally squared, that is taken from the quarry to the mill for sawing, slabbing, and further working.
6. A mechanical

block

1. <unit> A unit of data or memory, often, but not exclusively, on a magnetic disk or magnetic tape.

Compare record, sector.

block

(1) A group of disk or tape records that is stored and transferred as a single unit. On a CD, a block consists of 98 frames of 33 bytes for a total of 3,234 bytes, or 1/75th of a second. See block level.

(2) A group of bits or bytes that is transmitted or processed as a single unit.

(3) A group of text characters that has been marked for moving, copying, saving or other operation.

(4) A rectangular group of pixels that are processed as a unit.

(5) A group of program statements that are treated as a unit based on the results of a comparison.
References in classic literature ?
And Joe, picking up one more block, desperately tossed it out of the car.
But he, strong man and hearty, used to such work, weary with the hard day and with a pleasant picture of the bright little flat waiting him a dozen blocks away when the job was done, spoke cheerfully, confidently, saying that he'd have them out in a jiffy, as he stooped and crawled under the car on hands and knees.
One of the machines swerved wildly at high speed half a block down, and the next moment, already left well behind it, the pavement was torn into a great hole by a bursting bomb.
At the bottom the masonry rested upon a massive block measuring thirty feet in thickness, while on the upper portion it was level with the surrounding soil.
It was so beautiful, that even the blocks of ice danced about for joy; and when they were tired and laid themselves down, they formed exactly the letters which the Snow Queen had told him to find out; so now he was his own master, and he would have the whole world and a pair of new skates into the bargain.
Five blocks Soapy travelled before his courage permitted him to woo capture again.
He has carried with him a light tackle called a whip, consisting of only two parts, travelling through a single-sheaved block.
The streets were very full that day, but we got on pretty well as far as the bottom of Cheapside, where there was a block for three or four minutes.
I will not accept as the crown of my desires a block of buildings with tenements for the poor on a lease of a thousand years, and perhaps with a sign-board of a dentist hanging out.
On open ground, do not try to block the enemy's way.
A noise was heard like that the instrument of death would make if moved upon the block.
When Claude and Quasimodo went out together, which frequently happened, and when they were seen traversing in company, the valet behind the master, the cold, narrow, and gloomy streets of the block of Notre-Dame, more than one evil word, more than one ironical quaver, more than one insulting jest greeted them on their way, unless Claude Frollo, which was rarely the case, walked with head upright and raised, showing his severe and almost august brow to the dumbfounded jeerers.