freeze

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freeze

1. Meteorol a spell of temperatures below freezing point, usually over a wide area
2. the fixing of incomes, prices, etc., by legislation

freeze

[frēz]
(engineering)
To permit drilling tools, casing, drivepipe, or drill rods to become lodged in a borehole by reason of caving walls or impaction of sand, mud, or drill cuttings, to the extent that they cannot be pulled out. Also known as bind-seize.
To burn in a bit. Also known as burn-in.
The premature setting of cement, especially when cement slurry hardens before it can be ejected fully from pumps or drill rods during a borehole cementation operation.
The act or process of drilling a borehole by utilizing a drill fluid chilled to minus 30-40°F, (minus 34-40°C) as a means of consolidating, by freezing, the borehole wall materials or core as the drill penetrates a water-saturated formation, such as sand or gravel.
(physical chemistry)
To solidify a liquid by removal of heat.

freeze

Terms used in referring to arrivals that have been assigned ACLTs (actual calculated landing time) and to the lists in which they are displayed. See also actual calculated landing time.

freeze

To lock an evolving software distribution or document against changes so it can be released with some hope of stability. Carries the strong implication that the item in question will "unfreeze" at some future date.

There are more specific constructions on this term. A "feature freeze", for example, locks out modifications intended to introduce new features but still allows bugfixes and completion of existing features; a "code freeze" connotes no more changes at all. At Sun Microsystems and elsewhere, one may also hear references to "code slush" - that is, an almost-but-not-quite frozen state.
References in periodicals archive ?
University of Indiana School of Medicine researcher Hal Broxmeyer, and coauthors reported in the January Proceedings of the National Academy of Medicine they have been successful in successfully growing human cord blood frozen in 1985 and 1986 in laboratory cultures with the same success as fresh cord blood.