bloom


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bloom

1
1. a fine whitish coating on the surface of fruits, leaves, etc., consisting of minute grains of a waxy substance
2. Ecology a visible increase in the algal constituent of plankton, which may be seasonal or due to excessive organic pollution

bloom

2
a rectangular mass of metal obtained by rolling or forging a cast ingot

Bloom

 

a semifinished, metallurgical product made of steel, with a square cross section of more than 140 mm on a side, obtained from ingots by rolling in a rolling mill, the so-called blooming mill.


Bloom

 

a solid, spongy mass of iron (with a low carbon, sulfur, phosphorus, and silicon content) with slag inclusions that fill the pores and cavities. It may be obtained either directly from ore by reducing it at 1250°-1350°C or from pig iron.

bloom

[blüm]
(botany)
An individual flower. Also known as blossom.
To yield blossoms.
The waxy coating that appears as a powder on certain fruits, such as plums, and leaves, such as cabbage.
(ecology)
A colored area on the surface of bodies of water caused by heavy planktonic growth.
(engineering)
Fluorescence in lubricating oils or a cloudy surface on varnished or enameled surfaces.
To apply an antireflection coating to glass.
(geology)
(graphic arts)
A milky or foggy defect that may appear on the surface of a varnished painting; caused by moisture.
(materials)
Crystals formed on the surface of treated wood by exudation and evaporation of the solvent in preservative solutions.
(metallurgy)
A semifinished bar of metal formed from an ingot and having a rectangular cross section exceeding 36 square inches (232 square centimeters).
To hammer or roll metal in order to make its surface bright.
(mineralogy)
(optics)
Color of oil in reflected light, differing from its color in transmitted light. Also known as fluorescence.

bloom

1. The formation of a thin film of material on the surface of paint causing it to appear lower in gloss and milky in color. It varies in composition depending on the nature of the paint, drying conditions, etc., and may sometimes be removed with a damp cloth.
2. A type of efflorescence that appears on brickwork.
3. A discoloration or change in appearance of the surface of a rubber product (as sulfur bloom and wax bloom) caused by the migration of a liquid or solid to the surface.
4. A defect on a freshly varnished surface, appearing as a cloudy film.
5. A surface film on glass; usually results from the deposition of smoke or vapor.
References in classic literature ?
The captain swore polyglot, very polyglot, polyglot with bloom and blood, but he could do nothing.
Tenderly they gathered them, with the night-dew fresh upon their leaves, and as they wove chanted sweet spells, and whispered fairy blessings on the bright messengers whom they sent forth to die in a dreary land, that their gentle kindred might bloom unharmed.
Then will the earth bloom again in all its beauty, and your dim eyes will rest only on fair forms, while music shall sound through these dreary halls, and the love of grateful hearts be yours.
Heidegger; "and all of you, my respected friends, are welcome to so much of this admirable fluid as may restore to you the bloom of youth.
The colour on her cheek was like the bloom on a good apple, which is as sound at the core as it is red on the rind.
He had not been known to them as a boy; but soon after Lady Elliot's death, Sir Walter had sought the acquaintance, and though his overtures had not been met with any warmth, he had persevered in seeking it, making allowance for the modest drawing-back of youth; and, in one of their spring excursions to London, when Elizabeth was in her first bloom, Mr Elliot had been forced into the introduction.
And indeed on the Sunday fixed for this ceremony there was such a stir among the people, and such an enthusiasm among the townsfolk, that even a Frenchman, who laughs at everything at all times, could not have helped admiring the character of those honest Hollanders, who were equally ready to spend their money for the construction of a man-of-war -- that is to say, for the support of national honour -- as they were to reward the growth of a new flower, destined to bloom for one day, and to serve during that day to divert the ladies, the learned, and the curious.
I wouldn't be a bit afraid, and it would be lovely to sleep in a wild cherry-tree all white with bloom in the moonshine, don't you think?
Overhead was one long canopy of snowy fragrant bloom.
That is the reason why tulip blooms last so much longer than other blossoms.
It was a thing of awe whether for deathless gods or mortal men to see: from its root grew a hundred blooms and is smelled most sweetly, so that all wide heaven above and the whole earth and the sea's salt swell laughed for joy.
said Umslopogaas, pointing with the axe, "but if her flower blooms on any air, it is not here.