bloom

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bloom

1
1. a fine whitish coating on the surface of fruits, leaves, etc., consisting of minute grains of a waxy substance
2. Ecology a visible increase in the algal constituent of plankton, which may be seasonal or due to excessive organic pollution

bloom

2
a rectangular mass of metal obtained by rolling or forging a cast ingot

Bloom

 

a semifinished, metallurgical product made of steel, with a square cross section of more than 140 mm on a side, obtained from ingots by rolling in a rolling mill, the so-called blooming mill.


Bloom

 

a solid, spongy mass of iron (with a low carbon, sulfur, phosphorus, and silicon content) with slag inclusions that fill the pores and cavities. It may be obtained either directly from ore by reducing it at 1250°-1350°C or from pig iron.

bloom

[blüm]
(botany)
An individual flower. Also known as blossom.
To yield blossoms.
The waxy coating that appears as a powder on certain fruits, such as plums, and leaves, such as cabbage.
(ecology)
A colored area on the surface of bodies of water caused by heavy planktonic growth.
(engineering)
Fluorescence in lubricating oils or a cloudy surface on varnished or enameled surfaces.
To apply an antireflection coating to glass.
(geology)
(graphic arts)
A milky or foggy defect that may appear on the surface of a varnished painting; caused by moisture.
(materials)
Crystals formed on the surface of treated wood by exudation and evaporation of the solvent in preservative solutions.
(metallurgy)
A semifinished bar of metal formed from an ingot and having a rectangular cross section exceeding 36 square inches (232 square centimeters).
To hammer or roll metal in order to make its surface bright.
(mineralogy)
(optics)
Color of oil in reflected light, differing from its color in transmitted light. Also known as fluorescence.

bloom

1. The formation of a thin film of material on the surface of paint causing it to appear lower in gloss and milky in color. It varies in composition depending on the nature of the paint, drying conditions, etc., and may sometimes be removed with a damp cloth.
2. A type of efflorescence that appears on brickwork.
3. A discoloration or change in appearance of the surface of a rubber product (as sulfur bloom and wax bloom) caused by the migration of a liquid or solid to the surface.
4. A defect on a freshly varnished surface, appearing as a cloudy film.
5. A surface film on glass; usually results from the deposition of smoke or vapor.
References in classic literature ?
Nor would they leave then; but remained to fashion a rude head-stone from a crumbling out-cropping of sandstone and to gather a mass of the gorgeous flowers growing in such great profusion around them and heap the new-made grave with bright blooms.
Accordingly we went a-maying, following the lure of dancing winds to a certain westward sloping hill lying under the spirit-like blue of spring skies, feathered over with lisping young pines and firs, which cupped little hollows and corners where the sunshine got in and never got out again, but stayed there and grew mellow, coaxing dear things to bloom long before they would dream of waking up elsewhere.
But when the earth shall bloom with the fragrant flowers of spring in every kind, then from the realm of darkness and gloom thou shalt come up once more to be a wonder for gods and mortal men.
Final the captain, more red than ever, and in more tongues, tell him that he doesn't want no Frenchmen, with bloom upon them and also with blood, in his ship, with blood on her also.
Just underneath flamed a tangle of peonies in bloom, leaning down to the calm blue waters.
They give to us their all; ought we not to toil unceasingly, that they may bloom in peace within their quiet homes?
Now, would you deem it possible that this rose of half a century could ever bloom again?
And off I started, cursorily glancing sideways as I passed the toilet-table, surmounted by a looking-glass: a thin irregular face I saw, with sunk, dark eyes under a large, square forehead, complexion destitute of bloom or attraction; something young, but not youthful, no object to win a lady's love, no butt for the shafts of Cupid.
No more -- no more -- no more --(Such language holds the solemn sea To the sands upon the shore) Shall bloom the thunder0blasted tree, Or the stricken eagle soar!
A few years before, Anne Elliot had been a very pretty girl, but her bloom had vanished early; and as even in its height, her father had found little to admire in her, (so totally different were her delicate features and mild dark eyes from his own), there could be nothing in them, now that she was faded and thin, to excite his esteem.
And again in a futile struggle with reality her mother, refusing to believe that she could live when her beloved boy was killed in the bloom of life, escaped from reality into a world of delirium.
Haarlem, having placed on exhibition its favourite, having advertised its love of flowers in general and of tulips in particular, at a period when the souls of men were filled with war and sedition, -- Haarlem, having enjoyed the exquisite pleasure of admiring the very purest ideal of tulips in full bloom, -- Haarlem, this tiny town, full of trees and of sunshine, of light and shade, had determined that the ceremony of bestowing the prize should be a fete which should live for ever in the memory of men.

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