stain

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stain

a dye or similar reagent, used to colour specimens for microscopic study

Stain (microbiology)

Any colored, organic compound, usually called dye, used to stain tissues, cells, cell components, or cell contents. The dye may be natural or synthetic. The object stained is called the substrate. The small size and transparency of microorganisms make them difficult to see even with the aid of a high-power microscope. Staining facilitates the observation of a substrate by introducing differences in optical density or in light absorption between the substrate and its surround or between different parts of the same substrate. In electron microscopy, and sometimes in light microscopy (as in the silver impregnation technique of staining flagella or capsules), staining is accomplished by depositing on the substrate ultraphotoscopic particles of a metal such as chromium or gold (the so-called shadowing process); or staining is done by treating the substrate with solutions of metallic compounds such as uranyl acetate or phosphotungstic acid. Stains may be classified according to their molecular structure. They may also be classified according to their chemical behavior into acid, basic, neutral, and indifferent. This classification is of more practical value to the biologist. See Medical bacteriology

Stain

A coloring liquid or dye for application to any porous material, most often wood; thinner than paint and readily absorbed by the wood so that the texture and grain of the wood is enhanced, and not concealed.

stain

[stān]
(materials)
A nonprotective coloring matter used on wood surfaces; imparts color without obscuring the wood grains.
Any colored, organic compound used to stain tissues, cells, cell components, cell contents, or other biological substrates for microscopic examination.

stain

1. A discoloration in the surface of wood, plastic, sealant, etc.
2. A colorant for enhancing wood grain during finishing.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the present study, identification of a potential isolate for biocontrol experiments involved dual culture assays as a screening strategy against the spot blotch pathogen.
Comprehensive genetic analyses reveal differential expression of spot blotch resistance in four populations of barley.
Each central blotch is an outsize monument to the material residue of the density of urban life as well as witness to a morcellated subjectivity assailed by the technologies that cut it down the middle or split it apart.
In this study, we developed an AB population with the wild barley accession OUH602 as a resistance donor and Harrington as a recurrent parent to (i) validate resistance QTLs for the foliar diseases identified in our OUH602/Harrington RIL population, (ii) determine the genomic location of adult plant spot blotch resistance, (iii) assess the genetic characteristics of the AB population, and (iv) provide access to novel OUH602 alleles in an adapted genetic background for further breeding and genetics applications.
Overall, mean tail blotch counts were higher for males than females (t = 5.
Most of the red blotch I've seen in the Foothills has a pattern that suggests it came in with planting material.
7% SL; anterior extent of predorsal squamation reaching anteriorly to vertical through posterior margin of preopercle, with a few scales sometimes extending slightly beyond this point; first dorsal fin elements with 2-3 dark blotches on each element giving appearance of 2-3 longitudinal stripes across fin; lower body with two rows of dark spots, spots in two rows directly above one another, beginning immediately behind pectoral fin base and terminating just anterior to dark blotch at base of caudal fin; upper and lower spots more distinctly separate from one another anteriorly, becoming closer to one another and loosely connected posteriorly; arrangement of spots appearing as 6 to 7 sets of vertically paired spots often forming "=" shaped markings along ventral portion of trunk.
In our routine field trials at Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India, we observed that genotypes that had leaf tip necrosis showed lesser spot blotch development than those without this trait (Joshi and Chand, unpublished data, 1998).
2 illustrates the highest degree observed of secondary splitting of dorsal blotches, yielding a possible count of 47 in an animal basically with fewer, certainly no more than 44; because of this ambiguity its dorsal blotch count was not entered in the statistical analyses.
Overall, they studied 10 males of known age and 26 whose ages were estimated based on the extent of blotch darkening when first observed.
A total of 86% of the 200 farmers surveyed by agri-business Sygenta pinpointed rhynchosporium, while 60% included net blotch, 53% mildew and 42% rust in their lists of problems.