Horn

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Horn:

see King HornKing Horn,
probably the earliest English-language romance, written c.1250 and containing about 1,500 lines. It is by an anonymous author and is based on an earlier work in French.
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horn,

in symphonic and chamber music: see French hornFrench horn,
brass wind musical instrument. Fundamentally a metal tube of narrow conical bore, it is curved into circles because of its great length. The horn ends in a wide flare. It is a development (c.1650) of the small hunting horn.
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horn,

in zoology, one of a pair of structures projecting from the head of a hoofed animal, used chiefly as a weapon. In cattle, sheep, Old World antelopes, and related animals the horns are permanent and unbranched and are usually present in both sexes. They are composed of a sheath of keratin—a tough fibrous material derived from epithelial tissue—overlying a bony core projecting from the skull. In the deer family the branched structures, called antlers, are composed entirely of bone with no actual horn substance; they are usually present only in the male and are shed annually. The horns of the pronghorn have characteristics of both true horns and antlers. Rhinoceros horns are not true horn but greatly modified hair, derived entirely from the epidermis. Horns have long been used for many purposes, e.g., drinking cups, spoons, trumpets, containers for gunpowder, and combs. Carved pieces of horn have been found dating from prehistoric times. In art and religion horns symbolize power. The "horns of the altar" (Amos 3.14) symbolized divine protection. Hornlike protuberances appear on other animals, e.g., on the horned toad and the horned pout.

Horn

The diagonally projecting points of the Corinthian and Composite orders; usually chamfered to protect the sharp edges.

Horn

 

in acoustics, a section of a tube with a variable cross section, used to increase the power radiated by sound sources and to concentrate the radiated acoustic power in a specific direction, in which case the sound source is coupled to the narrow end of the horn, or to amplify received sound, in which case some sort of sound receiver is attached at the narrow end.

Horns are most often used in horn loudspeakers, where they substantially increase the radiated acoustic power, especially in the low-frequency region, thus improving the loudspeaker’s efficiency. This is achieved as a result of the better matching between the radiator and the medium. The simplest horn has a conical shape. A more advanced type—the exponential horn—is used for operating over a broad frequency range, for instance, in amplifying and reproducing sound. In exponential horns, the cross-sectional area S varies along the horn’s axis x according to the formula S(x) = S0emx, where S0 is the cross section of the throat and m is a constant for the rate of taper of flare of the horn. Horns are used much less often for sound reception.

Horns are employed for the direct amplification of the human voice in megaphones. The principle of the horn is the basis for horn antennas in radio engineering.


Horn

 

one of the most ancient of the mouthpiece wind instruments. The earliest horns were made from the hollow horns of bulls. Later, horns were made out of wood, bark, ivory, or metal. The horn was a signal instrument used chiefly by shepherds, hunters, and the postal and military service. The first horn band, which consisted of perfected hunting horns, was formed in 1751. The horn was the prototype of many of the wind instruments with conical bores. The French horn evolved from the hunting horn.


Horn

 

a hard protuberance on the head of many extant ungulates and certain fossil reptiles (for example, horned dinosaurs) and mammals (Titantheria, Dinoceras), serving mainly as an organ of defense and, in the males of many species, as a weapon in the battle for a female.

There are several different types of horns in ungulates. Rhinoceroses bear one or two unpaired horns on the frontal and/or nasal bones; the horns consist of conical thickenings of cornified epidermis. Bovids have paired horns consisting of bony cores that develop on integumental bone which fuses with the frontal bone. The bony cores are covered with hollow, horny sheaths that grow continuously as the animal grows and the horn wears out. Only in the pronghorn do the horns periodically fall out. The paired horns of giraffes are formed of bony cores fused to the frontal bone and covered with soft skin and hair.

Deer have paired horns, or antlers, whose bony cores rest on pedicels of the frontal bones. The antlers of young deer are covered with soft skin, which later dries and falls off, revealing the bony foundation. It is characteristic for deer to shed their antlers periodically as a result of resorption of bony tissue at the site where the pedicels join the cores of the antlers. They grow new horns owing to the activity of the periosteal cells of the pedicel. Branching of the antlers increases with age. In all deer except the reindeer, only the males are antlered. The shedding and development of antlers is closely related to the activity of the sex glands. Hence, the antlers of castrated deer are not shed and do not grow. The horny sheath is used in the manufacture of various products, and the bony process yields bone oil, bone meal, and glue. The antlers in the velvet are a source of pantocrine.

N. S. LEBEDKINA

horn

[hȯrn]
(building construction)
A section projecting from the end of one of the members of a right-angle wood framing joint.
(electromagnetism)
(engineering acoustics)
A tube whose cross-sectional area increases from one end to the other, used to radiate or receive sound waves and to intensify and direct them. Also known as acoustic horn.
(geology)
A topographically high, sharp, pyramid-shaped mountain peak produced by the headward erosion of mountain glaciers; the Matterhorn is the classic example.
(metallurgy)
Holding arm for the electrode of a resistance spot-welding machine.

horn

horn, 1
1. Any projecting end of one of the members of a right-angle wood framing joint.
2. The extension of a sash stile below the bottom rail of an upper-hung sash, either for styling or to serve as a stop.
3. A horizontal extension of a windowsill beyond the jamb.
4. Same as spur, 1.
5. A volute, 1.
6. An acroterion, 2.

horn

horn
horn
i. An antenna shaped like a horn. Radar waves are radiated directly into space without benefit of a reflector. A horn is usually designed as an extension of a waveguide whose sides flare from the original waveguide size to a larger aperture size. Also called a horn radiator.
ii. A device for making a warning noise, as used, for example, in a landing-gear warning system.
iii. A short lever attached to a control surface, to which the control cable, other operating line, rod, or compensating weight or aerodynamic surface is attached, as in a rudder horn, elevator horn, or horn balance.

horn

believed to promote fertility. [Art: Hall, 157]

horn

1. either of a pair of permanent outgrowths on the heads of cattle, antelopes, sheep, etc., consisting of a central bony core covered with layers of keratin
2. the outgrowth from the nasal bone of a rhinoceros, consisting of a mass of fused hairs
3. any hornlike projection or process, such as the eyestalk of a snail
4. the antler of a deer
5. the constituent substance, mainly keratin, of horns, hooves, etc.
6. a primitive musical wind instrument made from the horn of an animal
7. any musical instrument consisting of a pipe or tube of brass fitted with a mouthpiece, with or without valves
8. Jazz slang any wind instrument
9. a device for producing a warning or signalling noise
10. an extension of an aircraft control surface that projects in front of the hinge providing aerodynamic assistance in moving the control
11. 
a. a hollow conical device coupled to the diaphragm of a gramophone to control the direction and quality of the sound
b. any such device used to spread or focus sound, such as the device attached to an electrical loudspeaker in a public address system
c. a microwave aerial, formed by flaring out the end of a waveguide
12. Geology another name for pyramidal peak
13. a stretch of land or water shaped like a horn
14. Bible a symbol of power, victory, or success

Horn

Cape. See Cape Horn