blowing pressure

blowing pressure

[′blō·iŋ ‚presh·ər]
(engineering)
Pressure of the air or other gases used to inflate the parison in blow molding.
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At temperatures in excess of 100 degrees Celsius the panels foam under blowing pressure, creating a fine-pore, pressure-resistant, non-combustible and heat-insulating foam which fills joins and gaps and prevents heat, fire and smoke spreading for a certain length of time.
The blowing pressure for the bottle is also just 20bar.
The air can then be switched to higher final blowing pressure such as 100 psi for final forming of the part.
Haessly and Ryan (1) investigated the effect of blowing pressure and temperature distribution on the final wall thickness and preform shape evolution in the ISBM process.
Since the blowing pressure forced the fabric against the walls of the tube, an effective device was required to pull the fabric and expanding strip through the unit.
Find the blowing clamp force (to keep molds closed during air blow): Projected area of blown section x blowing pressure (around 100 psi) / 2000.
A special mechanical mold locking system reportedly withstands 35 bar (507 psi) blowing pressure and leaves a smooth parting line.
The blowing pressure is recorded versus time using a pressure sensor (the pressure value is actually different from the imposed blowing pressure).
It focuses on reducing the volume of dead space, reducing the blowing pressure, and recycling the blowing air.
The parison inflation stage is highly complex, involving the interaction of several process variables, such as the parison thickness distribution (parison programming), blowing pressure, parison temperature profile, and the material characteristics.
High blowing pressure forces the bottle against the hot mold.
Genpak patented the use of heptane as a blowing agent because its high boiling temperature creates gas pressure at PET's processing temper ature of 480 F that matches typical blowing pressures for PS.