blowing snow


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blowing snow

[¦blō·iŋ ¦snō]
(meteorology)
Snow lifted from the surface of the earth by the wind to a height of 6 feet (1.8 meters) or more (higher than drifting snow) and blown about in such quantities that horizontal visibility is restricted.
References in periodicals archive ?
On January 12, 2000, Bell Helicopter Textron issued an information letter to all owners and operators of Bell 206 A/B helicopters (Bell Helicopter Textron Information Letter 206-00-80) stating that the Flight Manual for these helicopters would be revised to mandate engine re-ignition systems when operating in falling or blowing snow.
Moylan said that the $150,000 apparatus - along with two older ones - is being employed in locations where streets could be widened without blowing snow onto adjacent sidewalks and property.
The blowing snow rebuilt drifts that had begun melting after a winter of record snowfall.
The gusting winds and blowing snow in and around the mountaintop made for an extremely difficult hover environment requiring the pilot to continuously maneuver and adjust the aircraft.
Meetinghouse Hill Road, person snow blowing snow into the road; resident is home, but refusing to answer door.
Watch for snow accumulation on the downwind side of a higher-level roof, where blowing snow will collect, and could lead to collapse.
However, by early afternoon, Squaw Valley had begun offering partial refunds to those that braved the high winds and blowing snow.
Disabled cars soon narrowed side streets and major highways, and plows, already having difficulty keeping the blowing snow off roadways, were impeded by the thousands of motorists who desperately tried to get home.
Not only are we blowing snow, but events like the 9th Annual Killington Brewfest and 4th Annual taste of Killington come to town this weekend.
Hicks offered from the school department had descended on downtown and were blowing snow into the road, where a loader was scooping it into a truck and carrying it away.
Avalanche control work may close Highway 50 during heavy storms, while I-80 often suffers from zero visibility caused by high winds and blowing snow.
Visibility in the blowing snow was less than 200 yards, and in stronger gusts "if there's a car in front of you, you can't even see it," he said.