blow

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blow

Archaic
Metallurgy
a. a stage in the Bessemer process in which air is blasted upwards through molten pig iron
b. the quantity of metal treated in a Bessemer converter

blow

[blō]
(computer science)
To write data or code into a programmable read-only memory chip by melting the fuse links corresponding to bits that are to be zero.
(electricity)
Opening of a circuit because of excess current, particularly when the current is heavy and a melting or breakdown point is reached.

blow

1. See throw, 1.
2. The eruption of water and sand inside a cofferdam, causing flooding.

blow

To write code or data into a PROM chip by blowing the fuses of the 0 bits. The 1 bits are left alone.
References in classic literature ?
He said he had carried it for years; and since he had done so, he had never received a blow, and never expected to while he carried it.
The masterly horsemanship of the Disinherited Knight, and the activity of the noble animal which he mounted, enabled him for a few minutes to keep at sword's point his three antagonists, turning and wheeling with the agility of a hawk upon the wing, keeping his enemies as far separate as he could, and rushing now against the one, now against the other, dealing sweeping blows with his sword, without waiting to receive those which were aimed at him in return.
In his haste he jostled against the hunchback, who fell heavily upon him, and the merchant, thinking he was being attacked by a thief, knocked him down with one blow of his fist.
Well was it for Robin that he was quick and nimble of foot; for the blow that grazed a hair's breadth from his shoulder would have felled an ox.
He could feel the onward swing of the regiment about him and he conceived of a thun- derous, crushing blow that would prostrate the resistance and spread consternation and amaze- ment for miles.
Ay, and if it blows only a little harder things will begin to go.
The loss of the Tonquin was a grievous blow to the infant establishment of Astoria, and one that threatened to bring after it a train of disasters.
Impelled by the blows that rained upon him, now from this side, now from that, White Fang swung back and forth like an erratic and jerky pendulum.
Both men were clutching each other in a tense embrace; no blows were being struck at all.
It was as if the devil was in him, for he sprang here and sprang there, now thrusting and now cutting, catching blows on his shield, turning them with his blade, stooping under the swing of an axe, springing over the sweep of a sword, so swift and so erratic that the man who braced himself for a blow at him might find him six paces off ere he could bring it down.
But when they described the brutal blows he had rained on poor Patsy's face, and the chair he demolished when he vainly attempted to kick Patsy, Watson waxed secretly hilarious and at the same time sad.
Taking out two long, sharp knives, they struck two heavy blows on the Marionette's back.