blue cohosh


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Related to blue cohosh: black cohosh, dong quai, pennyroyal
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blue cohosh

blue cohosh

Woman’s herb that improves contractions during labor, makes menstruation more regular, alleviates heavy bleeding and pain (uterine, ovarian anti-inflammatory). It’s a uterine stimulant so do not take during pregnancy, could cause abortion. Also used for urinary tract infections, lung problems, cramps, epilepsy, Irritating to mucus membranes. From the single stalk rising from the ground, there is a single, large, three-branched leaf plus a fruiting stalk. Bluish-green leaflets are tulip-shaped, entire at the base, but serrate at the tip. Berries are poisonous. Roots only parts used. Usually never grows over 2 feet tall (.6m) See also Black Cohosh. Do not use if pregnant. Take very small amounts, preferably together with black cohosh. Test first.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Blue cohosh should be avoided in the first trimester.
A systematic review of the literature on blue cohosh found only in vitro studies of efficacy (increased estradiol-induced transcription in estrogen-responsive cells and increased tone in excised guinea pig uteri) and 3 case reports of maternal adverse events after ingestion (perinatal stroke, congestive heart failure with shock, and multiorgan hypoxic injury)?
For example, US paediatricians reported the case of a newborn baby whose mother had taken blue cohosh to promote uterine contractions (Jones and Lawson, 1998).
Licorice, dang gui, and blue cohosh showed clear evidence of binding to the estrogen receptor.
Visitors often notice and ask about the Blue Cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides).
Blue cohosh used to stimulate labor, should be wholly avoided in pregnancy.
Arrow grass, Black Locust, Blue Cohosh, Broomcarn, Buckeye (Horse chestnut), Cherry, Choke Cherry, Corn, Cockle, Dogbane, Elderberry, Hemp, Horse Nettle, Indian Hemp, Ivy, Johnson grass, Kafir, Laurel, Leucothoe, Lily of the Valley, Maleberry, Marijuana, Milkweeds, Milo, Nightshade, Oleander, Rhododendron, Sevenbark, Silver, Sneezewood, Sorghum, Stagger brush, Sudan grass, Velvet grass, White snakeroot, Wild Black Cherry, Wild Hydrangea.
Blue cohosh is often combined with black cohosh and taken as a uterine tonic or partus preparator during the last 6 weeks of pregnancy, said Dr.
One Web site promotes black cohosh and blue cohosh for use during pregnancy while another red flags these herbs as too dangerous to use during pregnancy.
One Web site promotes black cohosh and blue cohosh for use during pregnancy he said, while another red flags these herbs as too dangerous to use during pregnancy.