blue

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blue

1. any of a group of colours, such as that of a clear unclouded sky, that have wavelengths in the range 490--445 nanometres. Blue is the complementary colour of yellow and with red and green forms a set of primary colours
2. 
a. a sportsman who represents or has represented Oxford or Cambridge University and has the right to wear the university colour (dark blue for Oxford, light blue for Cambridge)
b. the honour of so representing one's university
3. Brit an informal name for Tory
4. any of numerous small blue-winged butterflies of the genera Lampides, Polyommatus, etc.: family Lycaenidae
5. Archery a blue ring on a target, between the red and the black, scoring five points
6. a blue ball in snooker, etc

blue

[blü]
(optics)
The hue evoked in an average observer by monochromatic radiation having a wavelength in the approximate range from 455 to 492 nanometers; however, the same sensation can be produced in a variety of other ways.

blue

in American flag, symbolizes justice. [Color Symbolism: Leach, 242; Jobes, 356]
See: Justice

Blue

A language proposed by Softech to meet the DoD Ironman requirements which led to Ada. ["On the BLUE Language Submitted to the DoD", E.W. Dijkstra, SIGPLAN Notices 13(10):10-15 (Oct 1978)].
References in periodicals archive ?
Kentucky Derby winner California Chrome, the bluecollar colt representing bluecollar connections, is being aimed at the Breeders' Cup Classic as he makes his first start since Triple Crown dreams were shattered with a fourth in the Belmont Stakes.
Xavier Beauvois' first film since 2010's "Of Cods and Men" riffs jovially on the true 1978 story of two bluecollar immigrants in small-town Switzerland who exhumed Charlie Chaplin's remains in a botched ransom attempt.
Does job stress affect injury due to labor accident in Japanese male and female bluecollar workers?
This association between the right and work is in part a co-option and neutralisation of working-class interests and identity, along similar lines to bluecollar Republicanism in the US.
educated people, college students, resident aliens, bluecollar workers,
The authorities resolved that a larger population would not only protect the young nation, but would also provide bluecollar workers to progress development after the war.
His most recent movie roles were playing the director of the CIA in Zero Dark Thirty and the gruff bluecollar father of a wannabe rock star in Not Fade Away last year.
This seems to go back to the time before fading traditional journalism began--when journalists came from bluecollar lives and the college-bred journalists were a new aspect in newsgathering (Stepp, 2010).
Diversity is an important issue to Caturano because he grew up in a mostly bluecollar neighborhood.
However, he was of the view that the sudden depreciation of the Indian currency does not usually benefit low-income or bluecollar workers, who comprise a large segment of the remitting population in Qatar.
Instead of gifts for Gia, he asked friends and family to donate to the Community Youth Athletic Center, a facility for at-risk youths in the bluecollar town of National City where his father, Mario Lopez Sr.
They find a significant negative impact of NAFTA on bluecollar workers, with smaller positive or negative effects on college educated workers.