blue

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blue

1. any of a group of colours, such as that of a clear unclouded sky, that have wavelengths in the range 490--445 nanometres. Blue is the complementary colour of yellow and with red and green forms a set of primary colours
2. 
a. a sportsman who represents or has represented Oxford or Cambridge University and has the right to wear the university colour (dark blue for Oxford, light blue for Cambridge)
b. the honour of so representing one's university
3. Brit an informal name for Tory
4. any of numerous small blue-winged butterflies of the genera Lampides, Polyommatus, etc.: family Lycaenidae
5. Archery a blue ring on a target, between the red and the black, scoring five points
6. a blue ball in snooker, etc

blue

[blü]
(optics)
The hue evoked in an average observer by monochromatic radiation having a wavelength in the approximate range from 455 to 492 nanometers; however, the same sensation can be produced in a variety of other ways.

blue

in American flag, symbolizes justice. [Color Symbolism: Leach, 242; Jobes, 356]
See: Justice

Blue

A language proposed by Softech to meet the DoD Ironman requirements which led to Ada. ["On the BLUE Language Submitted to the DoD", E.W. Dijkstra, SIGPLAN Notices 13(10):10-15 (Oct 1978)].
References in periodicals archive ?
My step-mother, of course, in-laws, out-laws, the over-extended family, thinning blood relations, a gaggle of barely surviving ill-wishers, frail & gaga friends, & a few relative surprises--Aunt Helen whose metabolism still functions though her brain is fudge, her fourth husband, Ned, a dead white male collector of postcards of depopulated federal parks, & my cousin-in-law's ex-wife Charlotte, a scarlet woman born to be slapped by a bluecollar man at a roadside bar.
Bluecollar workers in factories have, of course, long been on the front line in facing the ups and downs of business cycles, as well as the intensification of global pressures.
You may also discover that there are a large number of bluecollar workers who require employee physicals and drug screens from your pre-existing lab.
Nasreen [female, Lebanese origin, bluecollar father] commented:
For instance, individuals employed in bluecollar and service occupations are much more likely than white collar workers to work at sites that don't have no-smoking policies (Barbeau, Krieger, & Soobader, 2004; Bourne, Shopland, Anderson, & Burns, 2004), an inexpensive but effective policy to protect worker health and reduce employer health costs.
Career opportunity and organizational attachment in a bluecollar unionized environment.
Perhaps most telling in this respect is the fact that of the artist's two muses, one--Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, the Nobel Prize-winning Soviet novelist whose dissident views led to imprisonment and then exile--is decidedly Romantic, a solitary victim who, year after year, levied his lonely voice against social oppression (and lived out years of hard-won individualism in the Vermont woods before returning to the Motherland), while the other--John Travolta, America's quintessential bluecollar sex symbol--is "merely" romantic.
Comedy about a teen from a bluecollar family who becomes smitten with his teacher.
Jones and Simmons (1993: 228) write "that the downtowns of industrial, bluecollar communities are vulnerable to competition from suburban malls".
wants to build a $256 million natural-gas-fired plant in South Gate, a bluecollar city in Los Angeles County.
Don is bluecollar, single most of his life; Carla is a country girl with a college veneer who raised seven children.