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blue

1. any of a group of colours, such as that of a clear unclouded sky, that have wavelengths in the range 490--445 nanometres. Blue is the complementary colour of yellow and with red and green forms a set of primary colours
2. 
a. a sportsman who represents or has represented Oxford or Cambridge University and has the right to wear the university colour (dark blue for Oxford, light blue for Cambridge)
b. the honour of so representing one's university
3. Brit an informal name for Tory
4. any of numerous small blue-winged butterflies of the genera Lampides, Polyommatus, etc.: family Lycaenidae
5. Archery a blue ring on a target, between the red and the black, scoring five points
6. a blue ball in snooker, etc

blue

[blü]
(optics)
The hue evoked in an average observer by monochromatic radiation having a wavelength in the approximate range from 455 to 492 nanometers; however, the same sensation can be produced in a variety of other ways.

blue

in American flag, symbolizes justice. [Color Symbolism: Leach, 242; Jobes, 356]
See: Justice

Blue

A language proposed by Softech to meet the DoD Ironman requirements which led to Ada. ["On the BLUE Language Submitted to the DoD", E.W. Dijkstra, SIGPLAN Notices 13(10):10-15 (Oct 1978)].
References in periodicals archive ?
Ironic Use of Fairy Tale Motifs in The Bluest Eye;' The World of Toni Morrison, ed.
The result is an entirely new take on The Bluest Eye and Beloved and goes far beyond mere criticism, definitely capturing the cultural notes that are the true expression of these works.
But it is also vital to recognize that Morrison's interaction with Oprah produces more than just another example of contemporary society's obsession with media events, as the actual experience of reading Song of Solomon, Paradise, or The Bluest Eye intersects with these texts' transformations into objects of TV discourse.
In The Bluest Eye and Tar Baby, Morrison presents characters who are not capable of physically passing for white, and so the dynamics of crossing the color line are moved from the body to the psyche.
Among their topics are Song of Solomon and the journey home, mythopoetic syncretism in Paradise and the deconstruction of hospitality in Love, and ritual and other religions in The Bluest Eye.
As Byers reads the ending of her first novel, The Bluest Eye (1970), it asserts "that the destruction of Pecola Breedlove, a young Black girl, is a failure of the land, and.
In Kubitschek's chapter on The Bluest Eye, she emphasizes the constructed nature of identity in a "mythic reading" using Jungian archetypes and Greek myths.
As Naylor mentions in an interview with Toni Morrison, an introduction to The Bluest Eye served as catalyst for Naylor's career.
Likewise her reading of racism as ideology in Morrison's The Bluest Eye: "It is as if Morrison continues where Ellison left off, moving from an anatomy of ideology to an assertion of a positive alternative.
3] In Beloved (1988), a woman jumps overboard during the Middle Passage; in Jazz (1992), Violet's mother, Rose Dear, climbs into a well, drowning herself in 1892; in Sula (1973), the shell-shocked veteran Shadrack institutes National Suicide Day on 3 January 1920; on the opening page of Song of Solomon (1977), Robert Smith leaps from the top of Mercy Hospital on 18 February 1931; in The Bluest Eye (1970), Pecola Breedlove wills self-disappearance through a longing to possess the eyes of another face ("'Please God .
The introductory essay manages to give in a few pages an analysis of Morrison's work that carefully follows its genesis and development from The Bluest Eye to Jazz and Playing in the Dark.
Quiet as it's kept, it has been more than thirty years since The Bluest Eye and The Third Life of Grange Copeland first arrived in our bookstores, some fifteen years since the publication of The Color Purple, and more than a decade since the arrival of Beloved.